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Long-term outcome and quality of life of dogs that developed neurologic signs after surgical treatment of a congenital portosystemic shunt: 50 cases (2005–2020)

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  • 1 Section of Small Animal Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK
  • | 3 Bristol Veterinary School, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol, UK
  • | 4 Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists, Hursley, Winchester, UK
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • | 6 Small Animal Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ghent, Merelbeke, Belgium
  • | 7 School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Bearsden, Glasgow, UK
  • | 8 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
  • | 9 Centre Hospitalier Vétérinaire Atlantia, Nantes, France

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine survival time and quality of life of dogs that developed postattenuation neurologic signs (PANS) after surgical treatment of a single congenital portosystemic shunt and survived at least 30 days and identify whether neurologic signs present at the time of discharge would resolve or reoccur.

ANIMALS

50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and follow-up data relating to neurologic signs and seizure activity were obtained. Owners were asked to complete a questionnaire related to the presence of neurologic signs, including seizures, and their dog’s quality of life.

RESULTS

Thirty of the 50 (60%) dogs had postattenuation seizures with or without other nonseizure neurologic signs, and 20 (40%) had neurologic signs other than seizures. Neurologic signs had fully resolved by the time of discharge in 24 (48%) dogs. Signs resolved in 18 of the remaining 26 (69%) dogs that still had PANS other than seizures at the time of discharge. Seizures reoccurred in 15 of the 30 dogs that had postattenuation seizures. Twenty-seven of 33 (82%) owners graded their dog’s long-term (> 30 days after surgery) quality-of-life as high. Forty-five (90%) dogs survived > 6 months. Most (29/43 [67%]) neurologic signs (other than seizures) present at the time of hospital discharge resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings highlighted that survival times of > 6 months and a high QOL can be achieved in most dogs with PANS that survive at least 30 days. Most neurologic signs other than seizures resolved within 1 month postoperatively. Half of the dogs with postattenuation seizures had a reoccurrence.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine survival time and quality of life of dogs that developed postattenuation neurologic signs (PANS) after surgical treatment of a single congenital portosystemic shunt and survived at least 30 days and identify whether neurologic signs present at the time of discharge would resolve or reoccur.

ANIMALS

50 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and follow-up data relating to neurologic signs and seizure activity were obtained. Owners were asked to complete a questionnaire related to the presence of neurologic signs, including seizures, and their dog’s quality of life.

RESULTS

Thirty of the 50 (60%) dogs had postattenuation seizures with or without other nonseizure neurologic signs, and 20 (40%) had neurologic signs other than seizures. Neurologic signs had fully resolved by the time of discharge in 24 (48%) dogs. Signs resolved in 18 of the remaining 26 (69%) dogs that still had PANS other than seizures at the time of discharge. Seizures reoccurred in 15 of the 30 dogs that had postattenuation seizures. Twenty-seven of 33 (82%) owners graded their dog’s long-term (> 30 days after surgery) quality-of-life as high. Forty-five (90%) dogs survived > 6 months. Most (29/43 [67%]) neurologic signs (other than seizures) present at the time of hospital discharge resolved.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings highlighted that survival times of > 6 months and a high QOL can be achieved in most dogs with PANS that survive at least 30 days. Most neurologic signs other than seizures resolved within 1 month postoperatively. Half of the dogs with postattenuation seizures had a reoccurrence.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Appendix (PDF 186 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 127 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S2 (PDF 124 KB)

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Mullins (ronan.mullins@ucd.ie)