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Bilateral renal descensus and intravesicular ureteroneocystostomy for treatment of bilateral ureteral ligation and transection that occurred during ovariohysterectomy in two cats

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

6-month-old and 7-month-old spayed female domestic shorthair cats were referred because of complications associated with inadvertent bilateral ureteral ligation and transection during ovariohysterectomy.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Both cats had a 1- to 2-day history of lethargy, inappetence, and vomiting. Initial exam findings included lethargy, signs of abdominal pain, anuria, and dehydration. Clinicopathologic testing revealed azotemia and hyperkalemia. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peritoneal effusion and bilateral pyelectasia in both cats and retroperitoneal effusion in one. Fluid analysis in both cats supported a diagnosis of uroabdomen.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Exploratory celiotomy was performed in both cats, and bilateral ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Bilateral renal descensus and ureteroneocystostomy with an intravesicular mucosal apposition technique was successfully performed in both cats. Clinicopathologic evaluation performed 1 day after surgery in one cat and 5 days after surgery in the other revealed complete resolution of azotemia. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract performed approximately 4 months after surgery in the first cat and 1 month after surgery in the second cat revealed complete resolution of renal pelvic dilation bilaterally.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Bilateral intravesicular ureteroneocystostomy in conjunction with bilateral renal descensus was used successfully to treat bilateral ureteral transection that occurred in 2 cats during routine ovariohysterectomy. Limited treatment options currently exist for this serious complication, and euthanasia is often considered. This technique, which relies on the use of the natural surrounding tissues for successful treatment, can offer a potential treatment option to correct this uncommon but devastating complication.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

6-month-old and 7-month-old spayed female domestic shorthair cats were referred because of complications associated with inadvertent bilateral ureteral ligation and transection during ovariohysterectomy.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Both cats had a 1- to 2-day history of lethargy, inappetence, and vomiting. Initial exam findings included lethargy, signs of abdominal pain, anuria, and dehydration. Clinicopathologic testing revealed azotemia and hyperkalemia. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed peritoneal effusion and bilateral pyelectasia in both cats and retroperitoneal effusion in one. Fluid analysis in both cats supported a diagnosis of uroabdomen.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Exploratory celiotomy was performed in both cats, and bilateral ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Bilateral renal descensus and ureteroneocystostomy with an intravesicular mucosal apposition technique was successfully performed in both cats. Clinicopathologic evaluation performed 1 day after surgery in one cat and 5 days after surgery in the other revealed complete resolution of azotemia. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract performed approximately 4 months after surgery in the first cat and 1 month after surgery in the second cat revealed complete resolution of renal pelvic dilation bilaterally.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Bilateral intravesicular ureteroneocystostomy in conjunction with bilateral renal descensus was used successfully to treat bilateral ureteral transection that occurred in 2 cats during routine ovariohysterectomy. Limited treatment options currently exist for this serious complication, and euthanasia is often considered. This technique, which relies on the use of the natural surrounding tissues for successful treatment, can offer a potential treatment option to correct this uncommon but devastating complication.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Rosenblum (shira.rosenblum.vmd@gmail.com)