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Management of severe burn injuries with novel treatment techniques including maggot debridement and applications of acellular fish skin grafts and autologous skin cell suspension in a dog

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  • 1 Hixson-Lied Small Animal Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 3-year-old 27-kg female spayed American Bulldog with severe burn injuries caused by a gasoline can explosion was evaluated.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog had extensive partial- and full-thickness burns with 50% of total body surface area affected. The burns involved the dorsum extending from the tail to approximately the 10th thoracic vertebra, left pelvic limb (involving 360° burns from the hip region to the tarsus), inguinal area bilaterally, right medial aspect of the thigh, and entire perineal region. Additional burns affected the margins of the pinnae and periocular regions, with severe corneal involvement bilaterally.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog was hospitalized in the hospital’s intensive care unit for 78 days. Case management involved provision of aggressive multimodal analgesia, systemic support, and a combination of novel debridement and reconstructive techniques. Debridement was facilitated by traditional surgical techniques in combination with maggot treatment. Reconstructive surgeries involved 6 staged procedures along with the use of novel treatments including applications of widespread acellular fish (cod) skin graft and autologous skin cell suspension.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The outcome for the dog of the present report highlighted the successful use of maggot treatment and applications of acellular cod skin and autologous skin cell suspension along with aggressive systemic management and long-term multimodal analgesia with debridement and wound reconstruction for management of severe burn injuries encompassing 50% of an animal’s total body surface area.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 3-year-old 27-kg female spayed American Bulldog with severe burn injuries caused by a gasoline can explosion was evaluated.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog had extensive partial- and full-thickness burns with 50% of total body surface area affected. The burns involved the dorsum extending from the tail to approximately the 10th thoracic vertebra, left pelvic limb (involving 360° burns from the hip region to the tarsus), inguinal area bilaterally, right medial aspect of the thigh, and entire perineal region. Additional burns affected the margins of the pinnae and periocular regions, with severe corneal involvement bilaterally.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog was hospitalized in the hospital’s intensive care unit for 78 days. Case management involved provision of aggressive multimodal analgesia, systemic support, and a combination of novel debridement and reconstructive techniques. Debridement was facilitated by traditional surgical techniques in combination with maggot treatment. Reconstructive surgeries involved 6 staged procedures along with the use of novel treatments including applications of widespread acellular fish (cod) skin graft and autologous skin cell suspension.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The outcome for the dog of the present report highlighted the successful use of maggot treatment and applications of acellular cod skin and autologous skin cell suspension along with aggressive systemic management and long-term multimodal analgesia with debridement and wound reconstruction for management of severe burn injuries encompassing 50% of an animal’s total body surface area.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Figure S1 (PDF 1,439 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S2 (PDF 1,392 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S3 (PDF 448 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S4 (PDF 1,084 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S5 (PDF 656 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S6 (PDF 957 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S7 (PDF 334 KB)

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Walton (rwalton@iastate.edu)