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Use of rectal tissue for reconstruction of an anogenital cleft in a juvenile dog with recurrent rectal prolapse

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  • 1 Northeast Veterinary Referral Hospital, Plains, PA

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 4-month-old 4.2 kg sexually intact female mixed-breed dog was evaluated for rectal and vesicular tenesmus, intermittent rectal prolapse, fecal incontinence, and an anogenital cleft.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Rectal prolapse and an anogenital cleft were confirmed on physical examination. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were within respective reference ranges, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed no abnormalities. Urinalysis revealed evidence of a urinary tract infection.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

An H-perineoplasty was performed and the prolapse was reduced. The repair partially dehisced and was repaired (with concurrent reduction of a recurrent rectal prolapse) but dehisced again. There was limited tissue available for additional reconstruction. In another surgical procedure, the rectum was allowed to prolapse, the most dorsal 40% of the prolapsed rectal tissue was resected, and the rectal tissue margin and skin in this region were apposed. The remaining rectal tissue flap was folded ventrally, and the lateral margins of the aborad aspect were sutured to the dorsolateral vestibular mucosa. In a subsequent surgery, 2.5 to 3 cm of the rectal tissue flap was excised. The remainder was used to create ventral margins for the rectum and vestibular mucosa. The perineal skin between the anus and dorsal vulvar commissure was closed. The patient experienced mild cutaneous partial dehiscence of the repair that healed by second intention. Over an 18-month follow-up period, some fecal incontinence persisted, but straining resolved and urinary tract infection did not recur.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

For the dog of this report, the use of rectal mucosa in surgical repair of an anogenital cleft provided an acceptable clinical outcome.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 4-month-old 4.2 kg sexually intact female mixed-breed dog was evaluated for rectal and vesicular tenesmus, intermittent rectal prolapse, fecal incontinence, and an anogenital cleft.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Rectal prolapse and an anogenital cleft were confirmed on physical examination. Results of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis were within respective reference ranges, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed no abnormalities. Urinalysis revealed evidence of a urinary tract infection.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

An H-perineoplasty was performed and the prolapse was reduced. The repair partially dehisced and was repaired (with concurrent reduction of a recurrent rectal prolapse) but dehisced again. There was limited tissue available for additional reconstruction. In another surgical procedure, the rectum was allowed to prolapse, the most dorsal 40% of the prolapsed rectal tissue was resected, and the rectal tissue margin and skin in this region were apposed. The remaining rectal tissue flap was folded ventrally, and the lateral margins of the aborad aspect were sutured to the dorsolateral vestibular mucosa. In a subsequent surgery, 2.5 to 3 cm of the rectal tissue flap was excised. The remainder was used to create ventral margins for the rectum and vestibular mucosa. The perineal skin between the anus and dorsal vulvar commissure was closed. The patient experienced mild cutaneous partial dehiscence of the repair that healed by second intention. Over an 18-month follow-up period, some fecal incontinence persisted, but straining resolved and urinary tract infection did not recur.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

For the dog of this report, the use of rectal mucosa in surgical repair of an anogenital cleft provided an acceptable clinical outcome.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Kinsey (jrkinseydvm@gmail.com)