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Single, large, meshed full-thickness free skin graft for reconstruction of a dorsal lumbosacral wound defect in a dog

Yasmin Brown BVMedSci, BVM, BVS1, Filippo Cinti DVM, PhD1, Valerio Mattioli DVM2, and Guido Pisani DVM2
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  • 1 From Eastcott Veterinary Hospital, Swindon, SN3 3FR, England.
  • | 2 From Centro Veterinario Luni Mare, 19034 Luni (SP), Italy.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 12-year-old 32-kg neutered female crossbreed dog was treated for a large lumbosacral skin defect.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog had sustained multiple, penetrating dog bite wounds to the lumbosacral and gluteal regions 5 days earlier. The referring veterinarian had initiated treatment with amoxicillin–clavulanic acid, which was continued at a dosage of 8.75 mg/kg, SC, every 24 hours at the referral hospital. Examination of the skin defect revealed a large subcutaneous abscess in the dorsal lumbosacral region with draining perimeter tracts at the wound margin. The partial-thickness wound measured 24 × 35 cm and had multifocal regions of necrosis extending caudally from the dorsal aspect of the T11 vertebra to the tail base. The skin defect was bounded by discolored and necrotic skin edges.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog underwent extensive soft tissue wound reconstruction. A single, large, meshed full-thickness free skin graft was harvested from the left dorsolateral aspect of the thorax and grafted to the dorsal lumbosacral region, thereby enabling successful closure of the wound defect. Primary healing of the wound eventually occurred, without postoperative complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of a large, meshed full-thickness free skin graft led to a satisfactory outcome for this dog but required challenging postoperative management. Application of single, large, meshed full-thickness free skin grafts may be an option to manage large skin deficits in the lumbosacral area in dogs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 12-year-old 32-kg neutered female crossbreed dog was treated for a large lumbosacral skin defect.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog had sustained multiple, penetrating dog bite wounds to the lumbosacral and gluteal regions 5 days earlier. The referring veterinarian had initiated treatment with amoxicillin–clavulanic acid, which was continued at a dosage of 8.75 mg/kg, SC, every 24 hours at the referral hospital. Examination of the skin defect revealed a large subcutaneous abscess in the dorsal lumbosacral region with draining perimeter tracts at the wound margin. The partial-thickness wound measured 24 × 35 cm and had multifocal regions of necrosis extending caudally from the dorsal aspect of the T11 vertebra to the tail base. The skin defect was bounded by discolored and necrotic skin edges.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog underwent extensive soft tissue wound reconstruction. A single, large, meshed full-thickness free skin graft was harvested from the left dorsolateral aspect of the thorax and grafted to the dorsal lumbosacral region, thereby enabling successful closure of the wound defect. Primary healing of the wound eventually occurred, without postoperative complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Use of a large, meshed full-thickness free skin graft led to a satisfactory outcome for this dog but required challenging postoperative management. Application of single, large, meshed full-thickness free skin grafts may be an option to manage large skin deficits in the lumbosacral area in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Ms. Brown (yasminbrown6@hotmail.com).