Long-term follow-up of equine incisor endodontic treatments using an orthograde technique

Nicole du Toit Equine Dental Clinic, Dorset, UK

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 BVSc, PhD, DEVDC, DAVDC, MRCVS
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Christopher J. Pearce Equine Dental Clinic, Dorset, UK

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 BVSc, DEVDC, MRCVS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This retrospective clinical study was performed to determine the suitability and success rate of endodontic treatment of equine incisors presenting with apical and periapical disease.

ANIMALS

All horses presented to a referral equine dental clinic between March 2013 and December 2019 specifically selected as candidates suitable for endodontic treatment were included in this study.

METHODS

Initial clinical and radiographic presentation of incisor disorder cases suitable for endodontic treatment were recorded (88 incisors) and follow-up examination for long-term viability (8 months to 5 years) was performed in cases involving 32 incisors in total.

RESULTS

A total of 68 horses with 88 incisors were included in this study for endodontic restorative treatment. Different dental materials were used, with a temporary 3-layered technique using calcium hydroxide apically and temporary cement and resin composite occlusally most commonly used at the first treatment. Complete obturation with resin composite was performed in 48% of the cases requiring second treatments (50 incisors). Follow-up examination involving 32 incisors showed that successful endodontic treatment was achieved in 75% of the teeth treated.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Endodontic treatment of diseased incisors is a viable option in equid patients with a success rate comparable to humans in practice. The use of flowable resin composite as an obturation material has been shown to be successful at either the second treatment or in carefully selected patients at the first treatment.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This retrospective clinical study was performed to determine the suitability and success rate of endodontic treatment of equine incisors presenting with apical and periapical disease.

ANIMALS

All horses presented to a referral equine dental clinic between March 2013 and December 2019 specifically selected as candidates suitable for endodontic treatment were included in this study.

METHODS

Initial clinical and radiographic presentation of incisor disorder cases suitable for endodontic treatment were recorded (88 incisors) and follow-up examination for long-term viability (8 months to 5 years) was performed in cases involving 32 incisors in total.

RESULTS

A total of 68 horses with 88 incisors were included in this study for endodontic restorative treatment. Different dental materials were used, with a temporary 3-layered technique using calcium hydroxide apically and temporary cement and resin composite occlusally most commonly used at the first treatment. Complete obturation with resin composite was performed in 48% of the cases requiring second treatments (50 incisors). Follow-up examination involving 32 incisors showed that successful endodontic treatment was achieved in 75% of the teeth treated.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Endodontic treatment of diseased incisors is a viable option in equid patients with a success rate comparable to humans in practice. The use of flowable resin composite as an obturation material has been shown to be successful at either the second treatment or in carefully selected patients at the first treatment.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. du Toit (nicole@equinedentalclinic.co.uk)
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