Widespread prevalence of Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis detected in German Icelandic horse population: impact of anamnestic factors on etiology

Melusine Tretow Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany

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Anna M. Hain Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany

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Astrid Bienert-Zeit Clinic for Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare anamnestic factors in Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) in affected and nonaffected horses to detect risk factors for horses developing EOTRH.

ANIMALS

A total of 154 Icelandic horses, aged 15 years and older, examined at 22 locations in Lower Saxony, Germany. The investigations took place from October 2020 to December 2021.

METHODS

Anamnestic data were collected using an owner-completed questionnaire. Horses underwent a thorough physical examination and CBC. The rostral oral cavity was clinically examined, and intraoral radiographs of the incisors were taken. Clinical and radiographic findings were scored. Based on the results, the study population was separated into “EOTRH-affected” and “EOTRH-healthy” horses. Both groups were compared to identify differences within the anamnestic factors. In case of inconclusive findings, some horses were classified as “suspicious”.

RESULTS

The diagnosis of EOTRH was made in 72.2% (109/151) of horses. The risk of contracting the disease increased with the age of the horse (P = .004). In addition, there was a predisposition for male animals (P = .032). Feeding, keeping, and dental treatments showed no significant influence, while place of birth seemed to influence horses developing EOTRH (P = .017).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The results highlight how widespread EOTRH is among the German Icelandic horse population and the need for raising awareness of EOTRH, as many horses were not suspected of having EOTRH beforehand. Moreover, numerous etiological propositions exist, but, to date, no studies have investigated their relevance.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare anamnestic factors in Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) in affected and nonaffected horses to detect risk factors for horses developing EOTRH.

ANIMALS

A total of 154 Icelandic horses, aged 15 years and older, examined at 22 locations in Lower Saxony, Germany. The investigations took place from October 2020 to December 2021.

METHODS

Anamnestic data were collected using an owner-completed questionnaire. Horses underwent a thorough physical examination and CBC. The rostral oral cavity was clinically examined, and intraoral radiographs of the incisors were taken. Clinical and radiographic findings were scored. Based on the results, the study population was separated into “EOTRH-affected” and “EOTRH-healthy” horses. Both groups were compared to identify differences within the anamnestic factors. In case of inconclusive findings, some horses were classified as “suspicious”.

RESULTS

The diagnosis of EOTRH was made in 72.2% (109/151) of horses. The risk of contracting the disease increased with the age of the horse (P = .004). In addition, there was a predisposition for male animals (P = .032). Feeding, keeping, and dental treatments showed no significant influence, while place of birth seemed to influence horses developing EOTRH (P = .017).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The results highlight how widespread EOTRH is among the German Icelandic horse population and the need for raising awareness of EOTRH, as many horses were not suspected of having EOTRH beforehand. Moreover, numerous etiological propositions exist, but, to date, no studies have investigated their relevance.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 226 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S2 (PDF 59.8 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S3 (PDF 32.5 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S4 (PDF 61.1 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S5 (PDF 32.5 KB)
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