Multiple anthelmintic drug resistance in hookworms (Ancylostoma caninum) in a Labrador breeding and training kennel in Georgia, USA

Pablo D. Jimenez Castro Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Grupo de Parasitología Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia

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 DVM, PhD
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Kendra Durrence Taylor Farm Kennels, Sylvania, GA

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Stephen Durrence Taylor Farm Kennels, Sylvania, GA

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Leonor Sicalo Gianechini Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

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James Collins Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Department of Molecular Biosciences, Weinberg College of Art and Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

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Kayla Dunn Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
MySimplePetLab, Denver, CO

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Ray M. Kaplan Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
School of Veterinary Medicine, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the efficacy of the 3 major classes of anthelmintics used for the treatment of hookworms in dogs in the US and an extralabel treatment with an FDA-approved product for use in cats in a Labrador kennel with a history of persistent hookworm infections.

ANIMALS

22 dogs housed in a single kennel comprised of the following breeds: 19 Labrador Retrievers, 1 English Cocker Spaniel, 1 Chesapeake Bay Retriever, and 1 Boykin Spaniel.

PROCEDURES

We performed a fecal egg count (FEC) reduction test using 22 dogs that were allocated randomly to 1 of 5 treatment groups: pyrantel pamoate (Pyrantel pamoate suspension), fenbendazole (Safe-Guard suspension 10%), milbemycin oxime (Interceptor), moxidectin plus imidacloprid (Advantage Multi), and emodepside plus praziquantel (Profender topical solution for cats). FEC was performed on samples collected on days 0 and 11.

RESULTS

FEC reductions for the milbemycin oxime, moxidectin plus imidacloprid, and emodepside plus praziquantel groups were 43.9%, 57.4%, and 100%, respectively. The FEC increased following treatment for the pyrantel and fenbendazole groups.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

These data demonstrate that the Ancylostoma caninum infecting the dogs in this kennel are highly resistant to all major anthelmintic classes approved for use in dogs in the US but are susceptible to emodepside. This was the first report of multiple anthelmintic drug–resistant A caninum in a dog kennel that does not involve Greyhounds.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the efficacy of the 3 major classes of anthelmintics used for the treatment of hookworms in dogs in the US and an extralabel treatment with an FDA-approved product for use in cats in a Labrador kennel with a history of persistent hookworm infections.

ANIMALS

22 dogs housed in a single kennel comprised of the following breeds: 19 Labrador Retrievers, 1 English Cocker Spaniel, 1 Chesapeake Bay Retriever, and 1 Boykin Spaniel.

PROCEDURES

We performed a fecal egg count (FEC) reduction test using 22 dogs that were allocated randomly to 1 of 5 treatment groups: pyrantel pamoate (Pyrantel pamoate suspension), fenbendazole (Safe-Guard suspension 10%), milbemycin oxime (Interceptor), moxidectin plus imidacloprid (Advantage Multi), and emodepside plus praziquantel (Profender topical solution for cats). FEC was performed on samples collected on days 0 and 11.

RESULTS

FEC reductions for the milbemycin oxime, moxidectin plus imidacloprid, and emodepside plus praziquantel groups were 43.9%, 57.4%, and 100%, respectively. The FEC increased following treatment for the pyrantel and fenbendazole groups.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

These data demonstrate that the Ancylostoma caninum infecting the dogs in this kennel are highly resistant to all major anthelmintic classes approved for use in dogs in the US but are susceptible to emodepside. This was the first report of multiple anthelmintic drug–resistant A caninum in a dog kennel that does not involve Greyhounds.

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