Clinician prescribing practices for managing canine idiopathic acute diarrhea are not evidence based

Widmaier B. Francillon Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Jenessa A. Winston Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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 DVM, PhD, DACVIM
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Megan E. Schreeg Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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M. Leanne Lilly Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Valerie J. Parker Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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Adam J. Rudinsky Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Comparative Hepatobiliary and Intestinal Research Program, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

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 DVM, MS, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective

To characterize clinician preferences and justification for preferred methods for managing canine idiopathic acute diarrhea (IAD) and compare results to evidence-based literature.

sample

284 surveys from veterinarians in small animal first-opinion practice.

Methods

Veterinarians were asked to complete a survey (61 questions) including background demographic information, practice type and location, duration in practice, and management questions for canine IAD pertaining to nutritional, probiotic, antimicrobial, antidiarrheal, benign neglect, and other therapies. The survey was available between May 5, 2021, and August 30, 2021.

Results

Respondents reported that their preferred first-line therapy for canine IAD included dietary modification (41.3% of respondents), probiotics (20.1%), antimicrobials (21.2%), antidiarrheal medications (13.0%), and benign neglect (4.3%). The percentage of respondents who reported each therapy as either extremely effective or very effective for canine IAD varied by treatment, as follows: antimicrobials (75.2%), dietary modification (59.13%), antidiarrheal medications (42.5%), probiotics (35.5%), and benign neglect (6.52%). Perceptions of effectiveness, efficiency of treatment, and clinician justification for use were variable among treatments. Reported practice styles were occasionally in disagreement with evidence-based methods of canine IAD management.

Clinical Relevance

Current clinical management of IAD is not consistently in agreement with evidence-based recommendations. The results of this study underscore the continued need to evaluate veterinary prescribing practice trends compared to evidence-based recommendations and promote dissemination of new information.

Abstract

Objective

To characterize clinician preferences and justification for preferred methods for managing canine idiopathic acute diarrhea (IAD) and compare results to evidence-based literature.

sample

284 surveys from veterinarians in small animal first-opinion practice.

Methods

Veterinarians were asked to complete a survey (61 questions) including background demographic information, practice type and location, duration in practice, and management questions for canine IAD pertaining to nutritional, probiotic, antimicrobial, antidiarrheal, benign neglect, and other therapies. The survey was available between May 5, 2021, and August 30, 2021.

Results

Respondents reported that their preferred first-line therapy for canine IAD included dietary modification (41.3% of respondents), probiotics (20.1%), antimicrobials (21.2%), antidiarrheal medications (13.0%), and benign neglect (4.3%). The percentage of respondents who reported each therapy as either extremely effective or very effective for canine IAD varied by treatment, as follows: antimicrobials (75.2%), dietary modification (59.13%), antidiarrheal medications (42.5%), probiotics (35.5%), and benign neglect (6.52%). Perceptions of effectiveness, efficiency of treatment, and clinician justification for use were variable among treatments. Reported practice styles were occasionally in disagreement with evidence-based methods of canine IAD management.

Clinical Relevance

Current clinical management of IAD is not consistently in agreement with evidence-based recommendations. The results of this study underscore the continued need to evaluate veterinary prescribing practice trends compared to evidence-based recommendations and promote dissemination of new information.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Material S1 (PDF 191 KB)
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