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Letters to the Editor

The role of carbohydrates in feline diets

In the Timely Topics in Nutrition review article “Evidence does not support the controversy regarding carbohydrates in feline diets,” 1 the authors suggest that, for healthy cats, an upper limit of 50% of calories coming from carbohydrates in their diets is acceptable. But they also state that low-carbohydrate diets can help diabetic cats and achieve remission. 1 How are we to know that a cat is diabetic until it has been fed a high-carbohydrate, diabetogenic diet, to which, admittedly, many cats adapt. But they can develop other health consequences, which these