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Anesthesia Case of the Month

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA
History

A 9.5-year-old 20.4-kg spayed female Border Collie was referred to the oncology service of Washington State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of a right anal gland mass and hypercalcemia. The referring veterinarian had evaluated the dog 3 weeks earlier for a 1- to 2-year history of alopecia, polydipsia, polyuria, and polyphagia; noticed a right anal gland mass; and then performed a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, serum thyroid and parathyroid panels, and abdominal ultrasonography. The CBC and thyroid panel results were within reference limits; however, the biochemical analyses revealed mildly high serum alanine aminotransferase (141 U/L; reference range, 18

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Chohan (aschohan@ucdavis.edu)

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia