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BE WELL: Changing the culture of a college of veterinary medicine using a comprehensive and integrated approach to promote health and well-being

Rustin M. Moore DVM, PhD1, Brenda C. Buffington EdD, NBC-HWC, EP-C2, Susannah L. Abraham MEd1, Katie Reid PsyD1, Mary Jo Burkhard DVM, PhD1, Caroline El-Khoury MA, MBA1, Amanda M. Fark MSA, MBA1, Jenn Gonya PhD1, Jacqueline Hoying PhD, RN, NEA-BC3, Ryan N. Jennings DVM, PhD1, Sue E. Knoblaugh DVM1, Matthew B. Miller BA, MA, MBA1, Joelle Nielsen MSW, LSW1, Emma K. Read DVM, MVSc1, Sharon Saia MSW, LISW-S, CEAP4, Aaron M. Silveus BS, ASS, RVT1, Jonathan Yardley DVM1, and Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk PhD, APRN-CNP, FAANP2
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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • | 2 Office of the Chief Wellness Officer, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • | 3 College of Nursing, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
  • | 4 Employee Assistance Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Moore (moore.66@osu.edu)