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Diagnostic Imaging in Veterinary Dental Practice

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  • 1 Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service, William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
  • | 2 Anatomic Pathology Service, William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
  • | 3 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 16-month-old 35.0-kg castrated male mixed-breed dog was referred for progressive right maxillary swelling. The dog had been adopted 12 months earlier and had a history of maxillofacial trauma and resolved distemper virus infection. The owner reported that the dog was otherwise healthy.

The general physical examination did not reveal any clinically important abnormalities. Oral examination revealed numerous visibly missing teeth, including all canine teeth. There was marked right maxillary swelling associated with the visibly absent right maxillary canine and first premolar teeth. There was relative maxillary brachygnathism, which did not result in soft tissue

History and Physical Examination Findings

A 16-month-old 35.0-kg castrated male mixed-breed dog was referred for progressive right maxillary swelling. The dog had been adopted 12 months earlier and had a history of maxillofacial trauma and resolved distemper virus infection. The owner reported that the dog was otherwise healthy.

The general physical examination did not reveal any clinically important abnormalities. Oral examination revealed numerous visibly missing teeth, including all canine teeth. There was marked right maxillary swelling associated with the visibly absent right maxillary canine and first premolar teeth. There was relative maxillary brachygnathism, which did not result in soft tissue

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Arzi (barzi@ucdavis.edu)

In collaboration with the American Veterinary Dental College