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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
  • | 2 All Creatures Teleradiology LLC, Columbia, MO
  • | 3 US Meat Animal Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Clay Center, NE
  • | 4 Great Plains Veterinary Educational Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Clay Center, NE
History

A 7-day-old 40-kg mixed-breed beef heifer calf was presented for recheck evaluation because of persistent signs of inspiratory dyspnea. Four days earlier, the calf had been examined because of labored breathing with marked abdominal effort that developed after the calf (unwitnessed birth) had been kicked and appeared rejected by its dam; was deemed to have had a clinically normal body temperature, pulse, and behavior and no obvious signs of dysmaturity or congenital defects; and then tube fed 2 L of colostrum harvested from its dam. During the initial examination 4 days earlier, the calf was febrile (rectal temperature unknown),

History

A 7-day-old 40-kg mixed-breed beef heifer calf was presented for recheck evaluation because of persistent signs of inspiratory dyspnea. Four days earlier, the calf had been examined because of labored breathing with marked abdominal effort that developed after the calf (unwitnessed birth) had been kicked and appeared rejected by its dam; was deemed to have had a clinically normal body temperature, pulse, and behavior and no obvious signs of dysmaturity or congenital defects; and then tube fed 2 L of colostrum harvested from its dam. During the initial examination 4 days earlier, the calf was febrile (rectal temperature unknown),

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Dawes (MDawes@westernu.edu)