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Factors that impact recruitment and retention of veterinarians in emergency practice

Lori R. KoganDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

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Matthew BoothNVA Compassion-First Specialty and Emergency Medicine Animal Hospitals, Boulder, CO

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Mark RishniwVeterinary Information Network, Davis, CA

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine factors that impact emergency veterinarians’ decisions in selecting a place of employment and their perceptions of factors important in fostering a work environment conducive to long-term employment.

SAMPLE

433 Veterinary Information Network members who reported practicing emergency medicine in the US and were not diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.

PROCEDURES

An electronic survey distributed via the Veterinary Information Network data collection portal, made available from May 25, 2022, through June 15, 2022.

RESULTS

Factors rated as most important in selecting a place of employment included working with a highly trained support staff and collegiality of coworkers. Factor analysis was used to extract factors that can influence emergency medicine practitioners’ views of a work environment conducive to long-term employment. The factor found to be most important was leadership. All factors, except for professional growth, were rated as more important by female practitioners when compared to male practitioners.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Aspects promoted in emergency medicine veterinarian recruitment efforts should include, in addition to the innate nature of the position, the elements identified as most attractive to current practitioners. By better understanding the impact of gender, children status, and years practicing emergency medicine on the relative importance in creating workplace environments conducive to long term employment, hospitals can be better equipped to meet the needs of both their current employees as well as potential new hires.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine factors that impact emergency veterinarians’ decisions in selecting a place of employment and their perceptions of factors important in fostering a work environment conducive to long-term employment.

SAMPLE

433 Veterinary Information Network members who reported practicing emergency medicine in the US and were not diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care.

PROCEDURES

An electronic survey distributed via the Veterinary Information Network data collection portal, made available from May 25, 2022, through June 15, 2022.

RESULTS

Factors rated as most important in selecting a place of employment included working with a highly trained support staff and collegiality of coworkers. Factor analysis was used to extract factors that can influence emergency medicine practitioners’ views of a work environment conducive to long-term employment. The factor found to be most important was leadership. All factors, except for professional growth, were rated as more important by female practitioners when compared to male practitioners.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Aspects promoted in emergency medicine veterinarian recruitment efforts should include, in addition to the innate nature of the position, the elements identified as most attractive to current practitioners. By better understanding the impact of gender, children status, and years practicing emergency medicine on the relative importance in creating workplace environments conducive to long term employment, hospitals can be better equipped to meet the needs of both their current employees as well as potential new hires.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Appendix S1 (PDF 31 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 96 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 136 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 89 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 95 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 95 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 92 KB)
    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 95 KB)

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Kogan (lori.kogan@colostate.edu)