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Anatomic structures of the canine middle ear visible during endoscopic examination through a ventral or lateral approach

Emily C. VianiSurgery Department, Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, MA
Surgery Department, Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists, Houston, TX

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Caleb C. HudsonSurgery Department, Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists, Houston, TX

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Kristin A. ColemanSurgery Department, Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists, Houston, TX

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Philip I. AllenSurgery Department, Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists, Houston, TX

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the anatomic structures of the canine middle ear visible during endoscopic examination through ventral and lateral surgical approaches.

SAMPLE

5 cadaveric canine heads representing 4 breeds.

PROCEDURES

A descriptive study was performed. For each head, a lateral approach was performed on one side and a ventral approach was performed on the opposite side. Images were obtained with a 2.7-mm, 30° telescope.

RESULTS

Captured images were reviewed, and anatomic structures visualized through the lateral and ventral approaches were identified. The optimal approach, telescope position, and light post orientation to identify each anatomic structure were subjectively determined.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Middle ear evaluation with a telescope was technically straightforward and allowed identification of middle ear structures not typically visible with an open surgical approach. Findings may serve as an anatomic reference guide for future video-assisted surgical procedures of the middle ear. A better understanding of the location of anatomic structures in the middle ear may help to prevent unnecessary damage to fragile middle ear structures, such as nerves or blood vessels, during surgical procedures.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the anatomic structures of the canine middle ear visible during endoscopic examination through ventral and lateral surgical approaches.

SAMPLE

5 cadaveric canine heads representing 4 breeds.

PROCEDURES

A descriptive study was performed. For each head, a lateral approach was performed on one side and a ventral approach was performed on the opposite side. Images were obtained with a 2.7-mm, 30° telescope.

RESULTS

Captured images were reviewed, and anatomic structures visualized through the lateral and ventral approaches were identified. The optimal approach, telescope position, and light post orientation to identify each anatomic structure were subjectively determined.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Middle ear evaluation with a telescope was technically straightforward and allowed identification of middle ear structures not typically visible with an open surgical approach. Findings may serve as an anatomic reference guide for future video-assisted surgical procedures of the middle ear. A better understanding of the location of anatomic structures in the middle ear may help to prevent unnecessary damage to fragile middle ear structures, such as nerves or blood vessels, during surgical procedures.

Contributor Notes

Corresponding author: Dr. Viani (eviani@mspca.org)