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Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy after limb amputation and effect on outcome in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases

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  • 1 From the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, 40064 Ozzano Dell’Emilia, Italy
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Torino, 10095 Grugliasco, Italy
  • | 3 North Downs Specialist Referrals, Bletchingley, Surrey RH1 4QP, UK
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Science, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Science, University of Liverpool, Neston, Wirral CH64 7TE, UK
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
  • | 6 Division of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Department of Companion Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine of Vienna, 1210 Vienna, Austria
  • | 7 Oncovet, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine an optimal time interval between amputation and initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (TIamp-chemo) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases and whether TIamp-chemo was associated with outcome.

ANIMALS

168 client-owned dogs treated at 9 veterinary oncology centers.

PROCEDURES

Data were collected from the dogs’ medical records concerning potential prognostic variables and outcomes. Dogs were grouped as to whether they received chemotherapy within 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, or > 30 days after amputation of the affected limb. Analyses were performed to identify variables associated with time to tumor progression and survival time after limb amputation and to determine an optimal TIamp-chemo.

RESULTS

Median TIamp-chemo was 14 days (range, 1 to 210 days). Median time to tumor progression for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (375 days; 95% CI, 162 to 588 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (202 days; 95% CI, 146 to 257 days). Median overall survival time for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (445 days; 95% CI, 345 to 545 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (239 days; 95% CI, 186 to 291 days).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that early (within 5 days) initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy after limb amputation was associated with a significant and clinically relevant survival benefit for dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases. These results suggested that the timing of chemotherapy may be an important prognostic variable.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine an optimal time interval between amputation and initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy (TIamp-chemo) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases and whether TIamp-chemo was associated with outcome.

ANIMALS

168 client-owned dogs treated at 9 veterinary oncology centers.

PROCEDURES

Data were collected from the dogs’ medical records concerning potential prognostic variables and outcomes. Dogs were grouped as to whether they received chemotherapy within 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, or > 30 days after amputation of the affected limb. Analyses were performed to identify variables associated with time to tumor progression and survival time after limb amputation and to determine an optimal TIamp-chemo.

RESULTS

Median TIamp-chemo was 14 days (range, 1 to 210 days). Median time to tumor progression for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (375 days; 95% CI, 162 to 588 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (202 days; 95% CI, 146 to 257 days). Median overall survival time for dogs with a TIamp-chemo 5 days (445 days; 95% CI, 345 to 545 days) was significantly longer than that for dogs with a TIamp-chemo > 5 days (239 days; 95% CI, 186 to 291 days).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings indicated that early (within 5 days) initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy after limb amputation was associated with a significant and clinically relevant survival benefit for dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma without distant metastases. These results suggested that the timing of chemotherapy may be an important prognostic variable.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Marconato (laura.marconato@unibo.it).