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Use of imaging-guided intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiation therapy to treat a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma in a dog

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  • From the Department of Oncology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Yang), and Departments of Oncology (Kubicek) and Surgery (Pavletic), Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, MA 02130.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 14-year-old 5.6-kg (12.3-lb) castrated male Toy Poodle was evaluated because of high serum activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine amino-transferase and the presence of a hepatic mass.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Abdominal CT revealed a large (approx 6.8 X 7.1 X 6.5-cm) soft tissue mass along the midline of the liver. The mass either originated from the papillary process of the caudate lobe or the left medial liver lobe.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A partial liver lobectomy was performed, and approximately a third of the mass was successfully removed and submitted for histologic examination. Consultation with the oncology service was advised to determine whether radiation therapy could be used to treat the residual disease. On 5 consecutive days, the dog underwent imaging-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy-stereotactic body radiation therapy (4 Gy/treatment) with a simultaneous integrated boost to the center of the tumor. The dog received a base dose of 20 Gy that was then boosted to 28 Gy. In the 10-month period after completion of radiation therapy, the hepatocellular mass continued to decrease in size, and overall improvements in the dog's serum liver enzyme abnormalities were evident.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

There are few treatment options for dogs with incompletely excised hepatocellular carcinomas. On the basis of the positive outcome in this case, radiation therapy could be useful following incomplete surgical removal of hepatocellular carcinomas in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:392–395)

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 14-year-old 5.6-kg (12.3-lb) castrated male Toy Poodle was evaluated because of high serum activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine amino-transferase and the presence of a hepatic mass.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Abdominal CT revealed a large (approx 6.8 X 7.1 X 6.5-cm) soft tissue mass along the midline of the liver. The mass either originated from the papillary process of the caudate lobe or the left medial liver lobe.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A partial liver lobectomy was performed, and approximately a third of the mass was successfully removed and submitted for histologic examination. Consultation with the oncology service was advised to determine whether radiation therapy could be used to treat the residual disease. On 5 consecutive days, the dog underwent imaging-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy-stereotactic body radiation therapy (4 Gy/treatment) with a simultaneous integrated boost to the center of the tumor. The dog received a base dose of 20 Gy that was then boosted to 28 Gy. In the 10-month period after completion of radiation therapy, the hepatocellular mass continued to decrease in size, and overall improvements in the dog's serum liver enzyme abnormalities were evident.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

There are few treatment options for dogs with incompletely excised hepatocellular carcinomas. On the basis of the positive outcome in this case, radiation therapy could be useful following incomplete surgical removal of hepatocellular carcinomas in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:392–395)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Yang (eyang@vt.edu).