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Treatment of temporohyoid osteoarthropathy in horses with a basihyoid-ceratohyoid disarticulation technique: 6 cases (2018–2019)

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  • 1 from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe a technique for basihyoid-ceratohyoid disarticulation (BCD) in standing sedated horses affected by temporohyoid osteoarthropathy (THO) and report outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure.

ANIMALS

6 client-owned horses.

PROCEDURES

Electronic medical records of a veterinary teaching hospital were searched to identify horses that underwent BCD for treatment of THO from 2018 to 2019. Signalment, clinical data, use of the horse, and complications were recorded. Follow-up data obtained by telephone interview with owners included the clinical outcome and time to improvement after surgery, any persistent clinical signs, horse's activity level before onset of clinical signs and after BCD, subsequent use of the horse, and whether they would pursue the same treatment again.

RESULTS

All horses tolerated the procedure well, with no complications and improved neurologic function after BCD. Five of 6 horses had a reported activity level equal to or greater than that prior to having signs of THO. Three of 3 horses with acute ataxia prior to BCD reportedly had full resolution of this sign; 3 of 4 horses with facial nerve deficits prior to BCD had mild residual facial nerve deficits at follow-up. All owners indicated they would pursue BCD again.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The BCD procedure was performed safely in this sample of THO-affected horses that were sedated while standing, avoiding risks associated with general anesthesia and resulting in no adverse effects such as iatrogenic injury to neurovascular structures. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:300–305)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe a technique for basihyoid-ceratohyoid disarticulation (BCD) in standing sedated horses affected by temporohyoid osteoarthropathy (THO) and report outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure.

ANIMALS

6 client-owned horses.

PROCEDURES

Electronic medical records of a veterinary teaching hospital were searched to identify horses that underwent BCD for treatment of THO from 2018 to 2019. Signalment, clinical data, use of the horse, and complications were recorded. Follow-up data obtained by telephone interview with owners included the clinical outcome and time to improvement after surgery, any persistent clinical signs, horse's activity level before onset of clinical signs and after BCD, subsequent use of the horse, and whether they would pursue the same treatment again.

RESULTS

All horses tolerated the procedure well, with no complications and improved neurologic function after BCD. Five of 6 horses had a reported activity level equal to or greater than that prior to having signs of THO. Three of 3 horses with acute ataxia prior to BCD reportedly had full resolution of this sign; 3 of 4 horses with facial nerve deficits prior to BCD had mild residual facial nerve deficits at follow-up. All owners indicated they would pursue BCD again.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The BCD procedure was performed safely in this sample of THO-affected horses that were sedated while standing, avoiding risks associated with general anesthesia and resulting in no adverse effects such as iatrogenic injury to neurovascular structures. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:300–305)

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 83 KB)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Ragle (ragle@wsu.edu).