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Billroth II procedure for the treatment of spontaneous gastrointestinal perforation in two cats

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  • 1 From the Division of Small Animal Surgery, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, 3000 Bern, Switzerland.
  • | 2 From the Section of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland (Mullins).

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 9-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat (cat 1) and a 10-year-old castrated male Maine Coon cat (cat 2) were presented for recurrent feline lower urinary tract disease after receiving outpatient care from their primary veterinarians.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination findings for both cats were initially within reference limits. After a short period of hospitalization, both cats developed peritoneal effusion; results of cytologic analysis of a sample of the fluid were consistent with septic peritonitis. During exploratory laparotomy, perforation of the pylorus or proximal portion of the duodenum secondary to ulceration was identified.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Both cats underwent partial duodenectomy, partial gastrectomy (pylorectomy), and gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II procedure). The cats recovered from surgery and returned to a normal quality of life; however, each had mild episodes of anorexia but maintained a stable body weight. Cat 2 required additional surgery for trichobezoar removal 7 weeks later but recovered quickly. At 7 months after trichobezoar removal, cat 2 developed intermittent vomiting, but clinicopathologic, abdominal ultrasonographic, and upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic findings were within reference limits. At 9 (cat 2) and 13 (cat 1) months after the Billroth II procedure, both cats were reported to be in good general health and without gastrointestinal signs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In both cats, the Billroth II procedure was technically straightforward and associated with a full recovery and good medium- to long-term quality of life. A Billroth II procedure could be considered for treatment of cats with large mural lesions in the pyloroduodenal region.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 9-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat (cat 1) and a 10-year-old castrated male Maine Coon cat (cat 2) were presented for recurrent feline lower urinary tract disease after receiving outpatient care from their primary veterinarians.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination findings for both cats were initially within reference limits. After a short period of hospitalization, both cats developed peritoneal effusion; results of cytologic analysis of a sample of the fluid were consistent with septic peritonitis. During exploratory laparotomy, perforation of the pylorus or proximal portion of the duodenum secondary to ulceration was identified.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Both cats underwent partial duodenectomy, partial gastrectomy (pylorectomy), and gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II procedure). The cats recovered from surgery and returned to a normal quality of life; however, each had mild episodes of anorexia but maintained a stable body weight. Cat 2 required additional surgery for trichobezoar removal 7 weeks later but recovered quickly. At 7 months after trichobezoar removal, cat 2 developed intermittent vomiting, but clinicopathologic, abdominal ultrasonographic, and upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic findings were within reference limits. At 9 (cat 2) and 13 (cat 1) months after the Billroth II procedure, both cats were reported to be in good general health and without gastrointestinal signs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In both cats, the Billroth II procedure was technically straightforward and associated with a full recovery and good medium- to long-term quality of life. A Billroth II procedure could be considered for treatment of cats with large mural lesions in the pyloroduodenal region.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Barandun (marc.barandun@vetsuisse.unibe.ch).