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Use of percutaneous microwave ablation in the treatment of retroperitoneal neoplasia in three dogs

William T. N. CulpFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Eric G. JohnsonFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Carrie A. PalmFrom the Department of Medicine & Epidemiology (Palm), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Jenna H. BurtonFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Robert B. RebhunFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Carlos O. Rodriguez JrFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Michael S. KentFrom the Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences (Culp, Johnson, Burton, Rebhun, Rodriguez, Kent), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California;

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Craig B. GlaibermanDepartment of Clinical Studies, Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, California (Glaiberman).

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

3 dogs with retroperitoneal masses (2 renal and 1 located near the diaphragm) were treated by percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA).

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Dogs between 11 and 13 years of age weighing between 13.7 and 43.8 kg had either a renal mass (n = 2) or a mass located in the caudodorsal aspect of the retroperitoneal space near the right side of the diaphragm (1). Cytology revealed that one of the renal masses and the mass located near the diaphragm were malignant neoplasias. Findings on cytologic evaluation of a sample of the other renal mass was nondiagnostic. Maximum mass diameters ranged between 1.4 and 2.5 cm.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

All dogs were treated by percutaneous MWA. Probes were directed into tumors by use of ultrasound and CT guidance, and microwave energy was applied to each mass. Findings on imaging of each mass following MWA was consistent with successful treatment. No intraprocedural or major postprocedural complications occurred, and all dogs were discharged from the hospital within 3 days of treatment. Two dogs died at 3 and 21 months after MWA with no known local recurrence; 1 dog was still alive 64 months after treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although the indications for MWA in the treatment of neoplasia in companion animals are limited, the outcomes of dogs in the present report provided preliminary evidence that percutaneous MWA can be safely used to effectively treat retroperitoneal neoplasia. This procedure was successfully performed with image guidance in all 3 dogs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

3 dogs with retroperitoneal masses (2 renal and 1 located near the diaphragm) were treated by percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA).

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Dogs between 11 and 13 years of age weighing between 13.7 and 43.8 kg had either a renal mass (n = 2) or a mass located in the caudodorsal aspect of the retroperitoneal space near the right side of the diaphragm (1). Cytology revealed that one of the renal masses and the mass located near the diaphragm were malignant neoplasias. Findings on cytologic evaluation of a sample of the other renal mass was nondiagnostic. Maximum mass diameters ranged between 1.4 and 2.5 cm.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

All dogs were treated by percutaneous MWA. Probes were directed into tumors by use of ultrasound and CT guidance, and microwave energy was applied to each mass. Findings on imaging of each mass following MWA was consistent with successful treatment. No intraprocedural or major postprocedural complications occurred, and all dogs were discharged from the hospital within 3 days of treatment. Two dogs died at 3 and 21 months after MWA with no known local recurrence; 1 dog was still alive 64 months after treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although the indications for MWA in the treatment of neoplasia in companion animals are limited, the outcomes of dogs in the present report provided preliminary evidence that percutaneous MWA can be safely used to effectively treat retroperitoneal neoplasia. This procedure was successfully performed with image guidance in all 3 dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Culp (wculp@ucdavis.edu).