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Cutaneous seeding of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder after placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass device in a dog with bilateral ureteral obstruction

Joshua L. MerickelDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

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Jessica LawrenceDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

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Shamar J. YoungDepartment of Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

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Christopher B. ThomsonDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 12-year-old spayed female Jack Russell Terrier was presented with pollakiuria and stranguria.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder trigone and urethra was diagnosed via CT, cystoscopic, and histologic examinations. Azotemia developed 2 weeks following diagnosis, secondary to bilateral ureteral obstruction.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Percutaneous antegrade ureteral stenting was unsuccessful; therefore, a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device with 2 nephrostomy and 1 cystostomy catheters was surgically placed. Two months following placement of the SUB device, the dog developed a firm, multilobulated cutaneous mass at the site of the subcutaneous access port of the SUB device. Results of cytologic examination of cells aspirated from the mass were consistent with TCC. Within 1 month of confirmation of TCC of the cutaneous mass, the mass was ulcerated and infected, and the dog was euthanized because of signs of pain and perceived poor quality of life.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Seeding of neoplastic cells is a known complication of needle aspiration or biopsy or surgery in people and dogs with carcinomas. The occurrence of TCC at the SUB port site suggested caution with the placement of a SUB device in dogs with obstructive TCC.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 12-year-old spayed female Jack Russell Terrier was presented with pollakiuria and stranguria.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder trigone and urethra was diagnosed via CT, cystoscopic, and histologic examinations. Azotemia developed 2 weeks following diagnosis, secondary to bilateral ureteral obstruction.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Percutaneous antegrade ureteral stenting was unsuccessful; therefore, a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device with 2 nephrostomy and 1 cystostomy catheters was surgically placed. Two months following placement of the SUB device, the dog developed a firm, multilobulated cutaneous mass at the site of the subcutaneous access port of the SUB device. Results of cytologic examination of cells aspirated from the mass were consistent with TCC. Within 1 month of confirmation of TCC of the cutaneous mass, the mass was ulcerated and infected, and the dog was euthanized because of signs of pain and perceived poor quality of life.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Seeding of neoplastic cells is a known complication of needle aspiration or biopsy or surgery in people and dogs with carcinomas. The occurrence of TCC at the SUB port site suggested caution with the placement of a SUB device in dogs with obstructive TCC.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Thomson's present address is Veterinary Specialty Hospital – North County, San Marcos, CA 92069.

Address correspondence to Dr. Thomson (chris.thomson2@colostate.edu).