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Surgical treatment of retroiliac ectopic ureters with secondary hydronephrosis and hydroureter in a dog

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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Surgical & Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 8-month-old 41.2-kg (90.6-lb) sexually intact male Dogue de Bordeaux with urinary incontinence and signs of nausea was referred for further evaluation and treatment of bilateral hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and ectopic ureters.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Clinicopathologic analyses revealed urine specific gravity and serum concentrations of urea nitrogen and creatinine within reference limits. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT revealed unilateral abdominal cryptorchidism, ureters that bilaterally passed dorsal to and appeared compressed by the external iliac arteries (retroiliac ureters), and bilateral hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and ectopic ureters. On CT, minimal uptake of contrast medium by the right kidney indicated either a lack of renal function or ureteral obstruction.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

The dog underwent exploratory laparotomy, right ureteronephrectomy, left neoureterocystostomy, bilateral castration, and incisional gastropexy without complication and was discharged 2 days postoperatively. Eleven days after surgery, the dog had improved but continued urinary incontinence, improved left hydronephrosis and hydroureter, and serum concentrations of urea nitrogen and creatinine within reference limits. At 24 months after surgery, the dog was reportedly clinically normal, other than having persistent urinary incontinence.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To our knowledge, this was the first report of a dog with retroiliac ureters and compression-induced ureteral obstruction with secondary hydroureter and hydronephrosis. Retroiliac ureters should be considered as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with ureteral obstruction. Our findings indicated that a good outcome was possible for a dog with retroiliac ureters treated surgically; however, the presence of additional congenital anomalies should be considered and may alter the prognosis in dogs with retroiliac ureters.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Munro's present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia.

Address correspondence to Dr. Culp (wculp@ucdavis.edu).