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Multicenter evaluation of decompressive cystocentesis in the treatment of cats with urethral obstruction

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether decompressive cystocentesis (DC) safely facilitates urethral catheterization (UC) in cats with urethral obstruction (UO).

ANIMALS

88 male cats with UO.

PROCEDURES

Cats were randomly assigned to receive DC prior to UC (ie, DC group cats; n = 44) or UC only (ie, UC group cats; 44). Abdominal effusion was monitored by serial ultrasonographic examination of the urinary bladder before DC and UC or before UC (DC and UC group cats, respectively), immediately after UC, and 4 hours after UC. Total abdominal effusion score at each time point ranged from 0 (no effusion) to 16 (extensive effusion). Ease of UC (score, 0 [easy passage] to 4 [unable to pass]), time to place urinary catheter, and adverse events were recorded.

RESULTS

No significant difference was found in median time to place the urinary catheter in UC group cats (132 seconds), compared with DC group cats (120 seconds). Median score for ease of UC was not significantly different between UC group cats (score, 1; range, 0 to 3) and DC group cats (score, 1; range, 0 to 4). Median change in total abdominal effusion score from before UC and DC to immediately after UC was 0 and nonsignificant in UC group cats (range, −5 to 12) and DC group cats (range, −4 to 8). Median change in effusion score from immediately after UC to 4 hours after UC was not significantly different between UC group cats (score, −1; range, −9 to 5) and DC group cats (score, −1; range, −7 to 5).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

DC did not improve time to place the urinary catheter or ease of UC in cats with UO.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Takacs' present address is Ebensburg Animal Hospital, Ebensburg, PA 15931.

Dr. Suran's present address is RadioLogic Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Services LLC, Media, PA 19063.

Address correspondence to Dr. Reineke (reineke@vet.upenn.edu).