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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 From the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845.
  • | 2 Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845.
History

A 16-year-old 487.2-kg (1,071.8-lb) Quarter Horse gelding was presented to a veterinary medical teaching hospital because of a 4- to 5-month history of intermittent, unilateral (right-sided) nasal discharge and epistaxis that did not improve with antimicrobial treatment. Additionally, right facial crest swelling had been observed approximately 3 weeks prior to presentation. The referring veterinarian performed skull radiography, which revealed a large mass lesion in the horse's right nasal cavity.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On physical examination, there was mildly decreased airflow from the right nostril, mildly increased expiratory noise on tracheal auscultation, and a small firm nodule over the

Contributor Notes

Dr. Schlemmer's present address is the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80525.

Dr. Ploeg's present address is the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, VIC 3030, Australia.

Address correspondence to Dr. Schlemmer (samantha.schlemmer@colostate.edu).