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Using a community engagement program to promote veterinary medicine while helping veterinary students improve their communication skills and increase their cultural understanding and well-being

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  • 1 Evaluation and Learning Research Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Administration and Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine. Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
Introduction

The AAVMC Foresight report1 identified community engagement as a means of promoting the societal value of veterinary medicine, garnering public trust, and educating young people about the role of veterinarians. Through community engagement, veterinary professionals can build relationships that create opportunities for community members to better trust and comply with medical recommendations to increase patient well-being.2,3 In addition, veterinary students may derive particular benefits from community-engagement opportunities. However, there is a dearth of research examining veterinary student community-engagement and service-learning experiences beyond the development of clinical skills.4

Community-engagement experiences for veterinary students

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. San Miguel (amasss@purdue.edu).