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Transorbital craniectomy for treatment of frontal lobe and olfactory bulb neoplasms in two dogs

Kathryn L. DuncanSouthpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

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Charles A. KuntzSouthpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

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James O. SimcockSouthpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals, Moorabbin, VIC 3189, Australia.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 8-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu crossbreed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old neutered male Miniature Fox Terrier (dog 2) were evaluated for removal of neoplasms involving both the frontal lobe and olfactory bulb.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination revealed decreased menace response and behavioral changes in both dogs. For dog 1, neuroanatomic localization of the lesion was the left forebrain region; for dog 2, neuroanatomic localization of the lesion was the right forebrain region. Both dogs underwent CT, and dog 1 also underwent MRI. Results of diagnostic imaging were consistent with frontal lobe and olfactory bulb neoplasia in both cases. Dog 1 had lysis of the frontal bone adjacent to the neoplasm.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Both dogs underwent a transorbital craniectomy to permit surgical tumor removal. Dog 1 was discharged from the hospital 48 hours after surgery, at which time its mentation and cranial nerve examination findings were considered normal. Dog 2 developed neurologic deterioration after surgery but was ultimately discharged from the hospital after 72 hours, at which time its mentation appeared normal.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The transorbital approach to the cranium provided excellent access to facilitate removal of frontal lobe and olfactory bulb neoplasms in these 2 dogs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 8-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu crossbreed dog (dog 1) and a 13-year-old neutered male Miniature Fox Terrier (dog 2) were evaluated for removal of neoplasms involving both the frontal lobe and olfactory bulb.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination revealed decreased menace response and behavioral changes in both dogs. For dog 1, neuroanatomic localization of the lesion was the left forebrain region; for dog 2, neuroanatomic localization of the lesion was the right forebrain region. Both dogs underwent CT, and dog 1 also underwent MRI. Results of diagnostic imaging were consistent with frontal lobe and olfactory bulb neoplasia in both cases. Dog 1 had lysis of the frontal bone adjacent to the neoplasm.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Both dogs underwent a transorbital craniectomy to permit surgical tumor removal. Dog 1 was discharged from the hospital 48 hours after surgery, at which time its mentation and cranial nerve examination findings were considered normal. Dog 2 developed neurologic deterioration after surgery but was ultimately discharged from the hospital after 72 hours, at which time its mentation appeared normal.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The transorbital approach to the cranium provided excellent access to facilitate removal of frontal lobe and olfactory bulb neoplasms in these 2 dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Duncan (kathryn.l.duncan@gmail.com).