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Disseminated pancreatic adenocarcinoma in an eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus)

Alexandre B. Le Roux1Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Katherine Quesenberry2Department of Avian and Exotic Medicine, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Kyle A. Donnelly2Department of Avian and Exotic Medicine, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Taryn A. Donovan3Department of Anatomic Pathology, Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.

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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 15-year-old 0.412-kg (0.906-lb) sexually intact male eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) was evaluated because its owners found it lethargic and dyspneic at the bottom of its cage.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The parrot was thin and had generalized muscle wasting, diffuse feather loss, pale mucous membranes, and melena. The coelomic cavity was distended and soft on palpation, with coelomic effusion suspected. Results of a CBC indicated leukocytosis with left shift heterophilia, including toxic heterophils, lymphopenia, and anemia. Plasma biochemical analyses revealed severe hyperamylasemia.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Radiography revealed no evidence of a metallic foreign body but severe loss of coelomic detail, suggestive of a coelomic mass, coelomic effusion with coelomitis, or both. Ultrasonography and CT revealed severe accumulation of coelomic fluid; a large, heterogeneous, irregularly marginated, and moderately vascularized mass in the caudal aspect of the coelomic cavity; and multiple hepatic, coelomic, and pulmonary nodules. On the basis of a poor prognosis, the parrot was euthanized. Necropsy results confirmed exocrine pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with disseminated metastases in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, coelomic cavity, and lungs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In birds, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is rarely reported but should be considered a differential diagnosis for hyperamylasemia, coelomic mass, coelomic effusion, or abnormal gastrointestinal signs, alone or in combination. Ultrasonography and CT can be useful in further evaluating such patients and should be considered in the diagnostic plan.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 15-year-old 0.412-kg (0.906-lb) sexually intact male eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) was evaluated because its owners found it lethargic and dyspneic at the bottom of its cage.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The parrot was thin and had generalized muscle wasting, diffuse feather loss, pale mucous membranes, and melena. The coelomic cavity was distended and soft on palpation, with coelomic effusion suspected. Results of a CBC indicated leukocytosis with left shift heterophilia, including toxic heterophils, lymphopenia, and anemia. Plasma biochemical analyses revealed severe hyperamylasemia.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Radiography revealed no evidence of a metallic foreign body but severe loss of coelomic detail, suggestive of a coelomic mass, coelomic effusion with coelomitis, or both. Ultrasonography and CT revealed severe accumulation of coelomic fluid; a large, heterogeneous, irregularly marginated, and moderately vascularized mass in the caudal aspect of the coelomic cavity; and multiple hepatic, coelomic, and pulmonary nodules. On the basis of a poor prognosis, the parrot was euthanized. Necropsy results confirmed exocrine pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with disseminated metastases in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, coelomic cavity, and lungs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In birds, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is rarely reported but should be considered a differential diagnosis for hyperamylasemia, coelomic mass, coelomic effusion, or abnormal gastrointestinal signs, alone or in combination. Ultrasonography and CT can be useful in further evaluating such patients and should be considered in the diagnostic plan.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Donnelly's present address is the Department of Comparative, Diagnostic, and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Address correspondence to Dr. Le Roux (alex.leroux@amcny.org).