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Age- and breed-matched retrospective cohort study of malignancies and benign skin masses in 660 dogs with allergic dermatitis treated long-term with versus without oclacitinib

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  • 1 1Animal Dermatology Clinic, Pasadena, CA 91711.
  • | 2 2Animal Dermatology Clinic, Tustin, CA 92780.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the cumulative incidences of malignancies and benign skin masses and the mean age at death or euthanasia in dogs with allergic dermatitis treated long-term with versus without oclacitinib.

ANIMALS

660 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify dogs with allergic dermatitis treated for ≥ 6 months with oclacitinib (exposed dogs; n = 339) versus other available treatments before the introduction of oclacitinib (nonexposed dogs; 321) and with ≥ 24 months of follow-up information available. Nonexposed dogs were age and breed matched with 321 of the exposed dogs; data for the remained 18 exposed dogs were included in statistical analyses. Results for cumulative incidences of malignancies and other variables were compared between groups, and the effect of daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib on cumulative incidences of malignancies and other skin masses was evaluated within the exposed group.

RESULTS

No meaningful differences were detected in the cumulative incidences of malignancies and overall skin masses or the mean age at death or euthanasia for dogs in the exposed group (16.5% [56/339], 56.6% [192/339], and 11.2 years [n = 80], respectively) versus the nonexposed group (12.8% [41/321], 58.3% [187/321], and 11.8 years [71], respectively). There was no association identified between daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib and odds of malignancy or benign skin masses for dogs in the exposed group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that long-term treatment with oclacitinib did not pose additional risk for malignancy in dogs; however, veterinarians should continue to observe FDA-approved label warning and precaution statements for oclacitinib and regularly screen for neoplasia in dogs with allergic skin disease treated with or without oclacitinib.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the cumulative incidences of malignancies and benign skin masses and the mean age at death or euthanasia in dogs with allergic dermatitis treated long-term with versus without oclacitinib.

ANIMALS

660 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify dogs with allergic dermatitis treated for ≥ 6 months with oclacitinib (exposed dogs; n = 339) versus other available treatments before the introduction of oclacitinib (nonexposed dogs; 321) and with ≥ 24 months of follow-up information available. Nonexposed dogs were age and breed matched with 321 of the exposed dogs; data for the remained 18 exposed dogs were included in statistical analyses. Results for cumulative incidences of malignancies and other variables were compared between groups, and the effect of daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib on cumulative incidences of malignancies and other skin masses was evaluated within the exposed group.

RESULTS

No meaningful differences were detected in the cumulative incidences of malignancies and overall skin masses or the mean age at death or euthanasia for dogs in the exposed group (16.5% [56/339], 56.6% [192/339], and 11.2 years [n = 80], respectively) versus the nonexposed group (12.8% [41/321], 58.3% [187/321], and 11.8 years [71], respectively). There was no association identified between daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib and odds of malignancy or benign skin masses for dogs in the exposed group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that long-term treatment with oclacitinib did not pose additional risk for malignancy in dogs; however, veterinarians should continue to observe FDA-approved label warning and precaution statements for oclacitinib and regularly screen for neoplasia in dogs with allergic skin disease treated with or without oclacitinib.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 177 kb)

Contributor Notes

Dr. Edginton's present address is Animal Medical Center of Seattle, Shoreline, WA 98155.

Address correspondence to Dr. Lancellotti (blancellotti@adcmg.com).