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Retrospective multicentric study comparing durations of surgery and anesthesia and likelihoods of short- and long-term complications between cats positioned in sternal or dorsal recumbency for perineal urethrostomy

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  • 1 1Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery and Veterinary Health Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 3 3Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61821.
  • | 4 4Department of Surgery, The Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10021.
  • | 5 5Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 6 6Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.
  • | 7 7Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74074.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term postoperative complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency versus dorsal recumbency for perineal urethrostomy (PU).

ANIMALS

247 client-owned cats that underwent PU between January 2004 and December 2015 at 6 veterinary teaching hospitals and 1 private veterinary referral hospital.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and signalment, presenting complaints, previous history of urethral obstruction or PU, diet fed, medications administered, indication for PU, durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, suture type and size, suture pattern for skin closure, and short- and long-term postoperative complications were recorded. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify differences in durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency and those positioned in dorsal recumbency.

RESULTS

Patient position was not associated with durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, even if a concurrent cystotomy was necessary or the patient required repositioning from sternal to dorsal recumbency. Likewise, patient position was not associated with the likelihood of short- and long-term complications.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The observed lack of differences in outcomes between sternal and dorsal recumbency suggested that logistic considerations and personal preference can continue to guide veterinarians when positioning cats for PU.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term postoperative complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency versus dorsal recumbency for perineal urethrostomy (PU).

ANIMALS

247 client-owned cats that underwent PU between January 2004 and December 2015 at 6 veterinary teaching hospitals and 1 private veterinary referral hospital.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and signalment, presenting complaints, previous history of urethral obstruction or PU, diet fed, medications administered, indication for PU, durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, suture type and size, suture pattern for skin closure, and short- and long-term postoperative complications were recorded. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify differences in durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency and those positioned in dorsal recumbency.

RESULTS

Patient position was not associated with durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, even if a concurrent cystotomy was necessary or the patient required repositioning from sternal to dorsal recumbency. Likewise, patient position was not associated with the likelihood of short- and long-term complications.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The observed lack of differences in outcomes between sternal and dorsal recumbency suggested that logistic considerations and personal preference can continue to guide veterinarians when positioning cats for PU.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Nye's present address is the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845.

Dr. Goode's present address is the Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Dr. Squire's present address is the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Dr. Runge's present address is Guardian Veterinary Specialists, Brewster, NY 10509.

Address correspondence to Dr. Nye (alicia.k.nye@gmail.com).