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Pathology in Practice

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  • 1 1Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 2 2Department of Pathology (Kirejczyk, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 3Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 4 4Department of Veterinary Biosciences and Diagnostic Imaging, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
History

An 8-year-old 43-kg (94.6-lb) castrated male Labrador Retriever was evaluated at the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of stranguria of 4 days’ duration. The dog was only able to expel a few drops of urine after straining for a prolonged time, although the urine produced was normal in appearance. The dog had no other notable medical history.

Clinical and Gross Findings

When the dog was first presented to the referring veterinarian, no abnormalities were identified on physical examination, and the results of routine hematologic and serum biochemical analyses were unremarkable. A urinary catheter was placed to allow

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Sommer (slthoma8@ncsu.edu).