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Neoplasia of the tubular genital tract in 42 goats

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Studies–New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348.
  • | 2 2Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 3Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence of tubular genital tract neoplasia in does evaluated at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals; describe the main clinical, surgical, and histopathologic or necropsy findings in affected does; and assess factors potentially associated with short-term prognosis in these animals.

ANIMALS

42 does.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were searched to identify does with neoplasia of the tubular genital tract. Signalment; history; physical and diagnostic imaging results; biopsy, surgery, and necropsy findings; and short-term outcome were recorded. Age and breed frequencies for the sample were compared with those of the overall hospital population, and variables of interest were tested for associations with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma and with short-term outcome by statistical methods.

RESULTS

Median age at hospital admission (10 years) was greater for the study sample than for the general hospital population (2 years). Pygmy goats were overrepresented (22/42 [52%]). Common reasons for evaluation were bloody vaginal discharge or hematuria and abdominal straining. Adenocarcinoma (13/42 [31%]), leiomyoma (13 [31%]), and leiomyosarcoma (11 [26%]) were the most common tumors. Does with distant metastasis had greater odds of a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (OR, 40.5) than does without distant metastasis. In the analysis adjusted for hemorrhagic discharge, odds of euthanasia for does with straining were 13 times those for does without straining. In the analysis adjusted for straining status, does with hemorrhagic discharge had almost 7 times the odds of euthanasia for does without this finding. The survival-to-discharge rate was low (13/42 [31%]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The frequency of adenocarcinomas in the study sample was unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to confirm the study findings.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the prevalence of tubular genital tract neoplasia in does evaluated at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals; describe the main clinical, surgical, and histopathologic or necropsy findings in affected does; and assess factors potentially associated with short-term prognosis in these animals.

ANIMALS

42 does.

PROCEDURES

Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were searched to identify does with neoplasia of the tubular genital tract. Signalment; history; physical and diagnostic imaging results; biopsy, surgery, and necropsy findings; and short-term outcome were recorded. Age and breed frequencies for the sample were compared with those of the overall hospital population, and variables of interest were tested for associations with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma and with short-term outcome by statistical methods.

RESULTS

Median age at hospital admission (10 years) was greater for the study sample than for the general hospital population (2 years). Pygmy goats were overrepresented (22/42 [52%]). Common reasons for evaluation were bloody vaginal discharge or hematuria and abdominal straining. Adenocarcinoma (13/42 [31%]), leiomyoma (13 [31%]), and leiomyosarcoma (11 [26%]) were the most common tumors. Does with distant metastasis had greater odds of a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (OR, 40.5) than does without distant metastasis. In the analysis adjusted for hemorrhagic discharge, odds of euthanasia for does with straining were 13 times those for does without straining. In the analysis adjusted for straining status, does with hemorrhagic discharge had almost 7 times the odds of euthanasia for does without this finding. The survival-to-discharge rate was low (13/42 [31%]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The frequency of adenocarcinomas in the study sample was unexpectedly high. Further research is needed to confirm the study findings.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Linton (jlinton@vet.upenn.edu).