• 1. Brennan KE, Ihrke PJ. Grass awn migration in dogs and cats: a retrospective study of 182 cases. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1983;182:12011204.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Jones JC, Ober CP. Computed tomographic diagnosis of non-gastrointestinal foreign bodies in dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2007;43:99111.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Vansteenkiste DP, Lee KC, Lamb CR. Computed tomographic findings in 44 dogs and 10 cats with grass seed foreign bodies. J Small Anim Pract 2014;55:579584.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Armbrust LJ, Biller DS, Radlinsky MG, et al. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of foreign bodies associated with chronic draining tracts and abscesses in dogs. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2003;44:6670.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Staudte KL, Hopper BJ, Gibson NR, et al. Use of ultrasound to facilitate surgical removal of non-enteric foreign bodies in 17 dogs. J Small Anim Pract 2004;45:395400.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Bouabdallah R, Moissonnier P, Delisle F, et al. Use of preoperative computed tomography for surgical treatment of recurrent draining tracts. J Small Anim Pract 2014;55:8994.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Dennis MM, Pearce LK, Norrdin RW, et al. Bacterial meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis due to migrating plant foreign bodies in three dogs. Vet Pathol 2005;42:840844.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Cherbinsky O, Westropp J, Tinga S, et al. Ultrasonographic features of grass awns in the urinary bladder. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2010;51:462465.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Calvo I, Weilland L, Pratschke K. Traumatic myocardial laceration as a result of suspected cranial migration of a sewing needle from the stomach of a dog. Aust Vet J 2011;89:444446.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10. Mahajan SK, Anand A, Sangwan V, et al. Surgical retrieval of a metallic foreign body from the spleen of a dog. Can Vet J 2012;53:399401.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Choi H, Lee Y, Wang J, et al. Metallic foreign body in the liver of a dog. J Vet Med Sci 2010;72:14871490.

  • 12. Lafuente P, Driver CJ. Migrating sewing needle in the cervical vertebral canal in a dog. BMJ Vet Rec Case Rep 2014;2:e000023.

  • 13. Pratt CL, Reineke EL, Drobatz KJ. Sewing needle foreign body ingestion in dogs and cats: 65 cases (2000-2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2014;245:302308.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Cottom EJ, Gannon K. Migration of a sewing needle foreign body into the brainstem of a cat. JFMS Open Rep 2015;1:2055116915589841.

  • 15. Walmsley GL, Scurrell E, Summers BA, et al. Foreign body induced neuritis masquerading as a canine brachial plexus nerve sheath tumor. Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2009;22:427429.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Gray B. Quality of life following traumatic brachial plexus injury: a questionnaire study. Int J Orthop Trauma Nurs 2016;22:2935.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Friedman DI, Forti RJ, Wall SP, et al. The utility of bedside ultrasound and patient perception in detecting soft tissue foreign bodies in children. Pediatr Emerg Care 2005;21:487492.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Su Y, Nan G. Using methylene blue as a marker to find and remove tiny metallic foreign bodies embedded in soft tissues of children: a randomised controlled trial. Int J Surg 2016;29:4348.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19. He B, Xu C, Mao Y, et al. A novel navigation system to guide metallic foreign body extraction. Int J Comput Assist Radiol Surg 2016;11:21052110.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Severe intermittent lameness secondary to a migrating metallic foreign body in a dog

View More View Less
  • 1 1William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 2Department of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

An 11-month-old mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of a 2-day history of acute-onset, intermittent vocalization and collapse several days after ingesting metallic wire foreign material.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Physical examination findings were initially unremarkable. After a brief period of hospitalization, the patient acutely developed non-weight-bearing lameness with signs of severe pain localized to the left thoracic limb and inability or refusal to rise. Results of cervical, thoracic, and abdominal radiography revealed a linear metallic foreign body at the thoracic inlet and a single metallic foreign body in the cranial aspect of the abdomen. Neuropathic pain at the level of the left brachial plexus was suspected. Results of a subsequent CT scan were consistent with a metallic foreign body in the left axilla with associated abscess formation and neuritis and an additional metallic foreign body within the omental fat near the pyloroduodenal junction.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Intraoperative fluoroscopy was used to facilitate localization and surgical removal of the axillary foreign body. The intra-abdominal foreign body was removed laparoscopically. Complete resolution of clinical signs was observed before discharge from the hospital the following day. On telephone follow-up 8 months after surgery, the owners reported the patient had no signs of lameness or complications.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Migrating metallic foreign bodies may be identified as incidental findings with the potential to cause harm in the future or may be a cause for severe clinical signs. Migrating foreign bodies should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients reported to have acute collapse or lameness and consistent clinical history.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Epstein (seepstein@ucdavis.edu).