• 1. Baldwin K, Bartges J, Buffington T, et al. AAHA nutritional assessment guidelines for dogs and cats. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2010;46:285296.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. WSAVA Nutritional Assessment Guidelines Task Force, Freeman L, Becvarova I, et al. WSAVA nutritional guidelines. J Small Anim Pract 2011;52:385396.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Michel KE. Using a diet history to improve adherence to dietary recommendations. Compend Contin Educ Vet 2009;31:2224.

  • 4. Laflamme DP. Companion animals symposium: obesity in dogs and cats: what is wrong with being fat? J Anim Sci 2012;90:16531662.

  • 5. Verlinden A, Hesta M, Millet S, et al. Food allergy in dogs and cats: A review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2006;46:259273.

  • 6. MacMartin C, Wheat HC, Coe JB, et al. Effect of question design on dietary information solicited during veterinarian-client interactions in companion animal practice in Ontario, Canada. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;246:12031214.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. MacMartin C, Wheat HC, Coe JB, et al. Conversation analysis of veterinarians' proposals for long-term dietary change in companion animal practice in Ontario, Canada. J Vet Med Educ 2018;45:120.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Bartges JW, Kirk CA, Lauten SD. Nutrition in disease. In: Morgan RV, ed. Handbook of small animal practice. 5th ed. St Louis: Saunders-Elsevier, 2008;11761186.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Adams CL, Kurtz SA. Skills for communicating in veterinary medicine. Parsippany, NJ: Dewpoint Publishing, 2017;90100.

  • 10. Tapsell LC, Brenninger V, Barnard J. Applying conversation analysis to foster accurate reporting in the diet history interview. J Am Diet Assoc 2000;100:818824.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Ontario Veterinary College Clinical Nutrition Service. Diet history form for pet owners. Available at: ovc.uoguelph.ca/hsc/en/resources/451244Nov2013ClinicalNutritionDietHistoryForm.pdf. Accessed May 1, 2015.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. WSAVA Global Nutrition Committee. Short diet history form. Available at: wsava.org/sites/default/files/Diet%20History%20%20Form.pdf. Accessed May 1, 2015.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13. Coe JB, Adams CL, Bonnett BN. A focus group study of veterinarians' and pet owners' perceptions of veterinarian-client communication in companion animal practice. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2008;233:10721080.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Effects of three diet history questions on the amount of information gained from a sample of pet owners in Ontario, Canada

Jason B. Coe DVM, PhD1, Rachel E. O'Connor MSc1, Clare MacMartin PhD3, Adronie Verbrugghe DVM, PhD2, and Kristen A. Janke DVM, BSc, BED1
View More View Less
  • 1 1Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 2Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 3 3Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, College of Social & Applied Human Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the effect of 3 diet history questions on the amount and type of diet-related information gathered from pet owners and to assess whether diet-related information obtained with each question in person differed from information obtained with a diet history survey.

SAMPLE

99 pet owners.

PROCEDURES

Participants' responses to 1 of 3 randomly selected diet history questions (“Tell me everything he [or she] eats throughout a day, starting first thing in the morning right through to the end of the day”; “What kind of food does she [or he] eat?”; or “What kind of foods does he [or she] eat?”) were recorded and coded for analysis. Participants completed a postinteraction diet history survey. Amount and type of diet-related information obtained were compared among responses to the 3 diet history questions and between the response to each question and the diet history survey.

RESULTS

The “Tell me…” question elicited a significantly higher total number of diet-related items (combined number of main diet, treat, human food, medication, and dietary supplement items) than did the “What kind of food…” or “What kind of foods…” questions. The diet history survey captured significantly more information than did the “What kind of food…” or “What kind of foods…” questions; there was little difference between results of the diet history survey and the “Tell me…” question, except that treats were more frequently disclosed on the survey.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings reinforced the value of using broad, open questions or requests that invite expansion from clients for gathering diet-related information.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the effect of 3 diet history questions on the amount and type of diet-related information gathered from pet owners and to assess whether diet-related information obtained with each question in person differed from information obtained with a diet history survey.

SAMPLE

99 pet owners.

PROCEDURES

Participants' responses to 1 of 3 randomly selected diet history questions (“Tell me everything he [or she] eats throughout a day, starting first thing in the morning right through to the end of the day”; “What kind of food does she [or he] eat?”; or “What kind of foods does he [or she] eat?”) were recorded and coded for analysis. Participants completed a postinteraction diet history survey. Amount and type of diet-related information obtained were compared among responses to the 3 diet history questions and between the response to each question and the diet history survey.

RESULTS

The “Tell me…” question elicited a significantly higher total number of diet-related items (combined number of main diet, treat, human food, medication, and dietary supplement items) than did the “What kind of food…” or “What kind of foods…” questions. The diet history survey captured significantly more information than did the “What kind of food…” or “What kind of foods…” questions; there was little difference between results of the diet history survey and the “Tell me…” question, except that treats were more frequently disclosed on the survey.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings reinforced the value of using broad, open questions or requests that invite expansion from clients for gathering diet-related information.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Coe (jcoe@uoguelph.ca).