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Theriogenology Question of the Month

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.
History

A 10-year-old 550-kg (1,210-lb) multiparous Standardbred mare was referred for examination at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals because of signs of colic, ventral abdominal edema, and a high concentration of serum amyloid A. The mare was pregnant (336 days of gestation) and had a 2-day history of inappetence and increasing signs of discomfort and edema along the ventral aspect of the abdomen. The mare had no history of other medical problems or abnormalities during previous pregnancies. The mare had received altrenogest (0.88 mg/kg [0.4 mg/lb], PO) and flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg [0.5 mg/lb], IV) prior to referral.

On

Contributor Notes

Dr. Klingensmith's present address is Perry Veterinary Clinic PLLC, 3180 Rte 246, Perry, NY 14530.

Dr. Castillo's present address is University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.

Dr. Gorenberg's present address is American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005.

Dr. Fenn's present address is Equine Veterinary Medical Center in Doha, Al Shaqab Gate 9, Education City, Doha, Qatar.

Address correspondence to Dr. Diel de Amorim (md649@cornell.edu).