• 1. Simons MC, Ben-Amotz R, Popovitch C. Post-operative complications and owner satisfaction following partial caudectomies: 22 cases (2008 to 2013). J Small Anim Pract 2014;55:509514.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Chambers JN, Rawlings CA. Applications of a semitendinosus muscle flap in two dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1991;199:8486.

  • 3. Vnuk D, Babic T, Stejskal M, et al. Application of a semitendinosus muscle flap in the treatment of perineal hernia in a cat. Vet Rec 2005;156:182184.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Baines SJ, Aronson LR. Rectum, anus and perineum. In: Johnston SA, Tobias KM, eds. Veterinary surgery, small animal. 2nd ed. St Louis: Elsevier; 2018;17831827.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Riggs J, Ladlow JF, Owen LJ, et al. Novel application of internal obturator and semitendinosus muscle flaps for rectal wall repair or reinforcement. J Small Anim Pract 2019;60:191197.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Mortari AC, Rahal SC, Resende LAL, et al. Electromyographical, ultrasonographical and morphological modifications in semitendinosus muscle after transposition as ventral perineal muscle flap. J Vet Med A Physiol Pathol Clin Med 2005;52:359365.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Dorsal displacement of the rectum after proximal tail amputation and subsequent surgical repair by bilateral semitendinosus muscle transposition in a cat

View More View Less
  • 1 1AniCura Kleintierklinik Babenhausen, 87727 Babenhausen, Germany.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 6-year-old cat underwent tail amputation at the sacrococcygeal joint and was evaluated 5 days later because of necrosis of the skin at the surgery site and tenesmus. Tail amputation had been necessary as a result of vehicular trauma.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Neurologic examination of the cat revealed no abnormalities. Clinical evaluation and radiography confirmed dorsal displacement of the rectum as a result of removal of the tail and transected sacrocaudal and rectococcygeal musculature as well as muscles of the pelvic diaphragm. The rectum was dilated and filled with hard feces.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

To correct the dorsal displacement of the rectum, bilateral semitendinosus muscle transposition was performed to restore tissue to the void created by removal of the tail, sacrocaudal muscles, muscles of the pelvic diaphragm, and rectococcygeus muscle. The cat recovered uneventfully from surgery. No further displacement of the rectum occurred and no lameness attributable to bilateral transection of the semitendinosus muscles was noted during a 2-year follow-up period.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To the authors' knowledge, dorsal displacement of the rectum after proximal tail amputation and its surgical correction in a cat have not been described previously. The favorable outcome in this case suggested that bilateral semitendinosus muscle transposition can safely be used to address large muscular defects at the level of the caudal aspect of the sacrum and the perineum in cats.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 6-year-old cat underwent tail amputation at the sacrococcygeal joint and was evaluated 5 days later because of necrosis of the skin at the surgery site and tenesmus. Tail amputation had been necessary as a result of vehicular trauma.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Neurologic examination of the cat revealed no abnormalities. Clinical evaluation and radiography confirmed dorsal displacement of the rectum as a result of removal of the tail and transected sacrocaudal and rectococcygeal musculature as well as muscles of the pelvic diaphragm. The rectum was dilated and filled with hard feces.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

To correct the dorsal displacement of the rectum, bilateral semitendinosus muscle transposition was performed to restore tissue to the void created by removal of the tail, sacrocaudal muscles, muscles of the pelvic diaphragm, and rectococcygeus muscle. The cat recovered uneventfully from surgery. No further displacement of the rectum occurred and no lameness attributable to bilateral transection of the semitendinosus muscles was noted during a 2-year follow-up period.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

To the authors' knowledge, dorsal displacement of the rectum after proximal tail amputation and its surgical correction in a cat have not been described previously. The favorable outcome in this case suggested that bilateral semitendinosus muscle transposition can safely be used to address large muscular defects at the level of the caudal aspect of the sacrum and the perineum in cats.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Nikola Medl (nikola.medl@anicura.de).