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Use of percutaneous foam sclerotherapy with 1.5% sodium tetradecyl sulfate for treatment of a pelvic limb venous malformation in a dog

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  • 1 1Animal Medical Center, New York, NY 10065.
  • | 2 2Arteriovenous Malformation Center of New York at Lenox Hill, New York, NY 10075.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 6-year-old 17-kg (37.4-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of swelling and intermittent lameness of the right pelvic limb and perianal and vulvar bleeding caused by a suspected arteriovenous malformation.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The right pelvic limb had a diffuse, raised, cobblestone-like appearance with lameness, edema, and multifocal ulcerations. The abdominal skin had multifocal circular erythematous lesions, the perianal region was erythematous, and the vestibule had superficial distended vessels. Ultrasonography and CT did not reveal the presence of an arteriovenous malformation; however, digital subtraction venography confirmed the presence of a venous malformation (VM) throughout the limb.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A mixture of foam sclerosant (1.5% sodium tetradecyl sulfate) and contrast medium was agitated with air and injected percutaneously into the VM. The dog received an injection of corticosteroid solution, and a soft-padded bandage was applied to the limb for 3 days. Six weeks later, the dog would intermittently hop when running, and the limb was mildly edematous with ecchymotic lesions; the swelling and lameness had improved considerably. Perianal and vulvar bleeding and dilation of the vestibular vessels had resolved. At 21 months after the procedure, examination revealed no right pelvic limb lameness related to the VM; only small cyst-like lesions and edema around the tarsus remained.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The favorable clinical outcome for this dog for a 21-month period after treatment of a pelvic limb VM with foam sclerotherapy has suggested that foam sclerotherapy may be used to successfully treat limb VMs in some dogs.

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 6-year-old 17-kg (37.4-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of swelling and intermittent lameness of the right pelvic limb and perianal and vulvar bleeding caused by a suspected arteriovenous malformation.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The right pelvic limb had a diffuse, raised, cobblestone-like appearance with lameness, edema, and multifocal ulcerations. The abdominal skin had multifocal circular erythematous lesions, the perianal region was erythematous, and the vestibule had superficial distended vessels. Ultrasonography and CT did not reveal the presence of an arteriovenous malformation; however, digital subtraction venography confirmed the presence of a venous malformation (VM) throughout the limb.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A mixture of foam sclerosant (1.5% sodium tetradecyl sulfate) and contrast medium was agitated with air and injected percutaneously into the VM. The dog received an injection of corticosteroid solution, and a soft-padded bandage was applied to the limb for 3 days. Six weeks later, the dog would intermittently hop when running, and the limb was mildly edematous with ecchymotic lesions; the swelling and lameness had improved considerably. Perianal and vulvar bleeding and dilation of the vestibular vessels had resolved. At 21 months after the procedure, examination revealed no right pelvic limb lameness related to the VM; only small cyst-like lesions and edema around the tarsus remained.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The favorable clinical outcome for this dog for a 21-month period after treatment of a pelvic limb VM with foam sclerotherapy has suggested that foam sclerotherapy may be used to successfully treat limb VMs in some dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Weisse (chick.weisse@gmail.com).