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Pathology in Practice

Brandy Kastl DVM1,2, Lalitha Peddireddi DVM, PhD2, Becky Rankin DVM3, Kelli Almes DVM2, Rose Raskin DVM, PhD4, and Nora Springer DVM1,2
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  • 1 1Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 2 2Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Kansas State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Manhattan, KS 66506.
  • | 3 3Abilene Animal Hospital, Abilene, KS 67410.
  • | 4 4Department of Comparative Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
History

A 5-year-old 22.7-kg (49.9-lb) spayed female Boxer cross was presented to a primary care veterinarian for evaluation of multiple dermal nodules on both pinnae (Figure 1) Approximately 2 weeks earlier, the dog had been examined because of a suspected interdigital foreign body on the left forelimb. Sterile exploration of the lesion revealed no foreign material. Cephalexin (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h for 10 days) was prescribed. The dermal nodules began emerging several days after initiation of cephalexin administration. The dog was also maintained on diphenhydramine (2.2 mg/kg [1 mg/lb], PO, q 8 to 12

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kastl (bckastl@vet.k-state.edu).