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Postoperative thrombocytosis and thromboelastographic evidence of hypercoagulability in dogs undergoing splenectomy for splenic masses

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536
  • | 2 2Division of Biostatistics, Department of Quantitative Health Science, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the frequency and severity of thrombocytosis and thromboelastographic evidence of hypercoagulability during the first 2 weeks after splenectomy in dogs with splenic masses and to investigate relationships between platelet counts and thromboelastography values.

ANIMALS

34 dogs undergoing splenectomy for splenic masses.

PROCEDURES

Blood samples for platelet counts and thromboelastography were obtained at induction of anesthesia (day 0) prior to splenectomy and on days 2, 7, and 14.

RESULTS

Mean platelet counts were 167.9 × 103/μL, 260.4 × 103 μ/L, 715.9 × 103/μL, and 582.2 × 103/μL on days 0, 2, 7, and 14, respectively, and were significantly higher at all postoperative assessment points than on day 0. Thrombocytosis was observed in 3% (1/34), 6% (2/33), 81% (21/26), and 69% (18/26) of dogs on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. Platelet counts > 1,000 × 103/μL were observed in 1 dog on day 2 and in 5 dogs on day 7. One or more thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability were observed in 45% (15/33), 84% (26/31), 89% (24/27), and 84% (21/25) of dogs on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. At each assessment point, higher platelet counts were correlated with thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Marked thrombocytosis and thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability were common during the first 2 weeks after splenectomy for the dogs of this study. If present, hypercoagulability could increase the risk for development of postsplenectomy thrombotic conditions such as portal system thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the frequency and severity of thrombocytosis and thromboelastographic evidence of hypercoagulability during the first 2 weeks after splenectomy in dogs with splenic masses and to investigate relationships between platelet counts and thromboelastography values.

ANIMALS

34 dogs undergoing splenectomy for splenic masses.

PROCEDURES

Blood samples for platelet counts and thromboelastography were obtained at induction of anesthesia (day 0) prior to splenectomy and on days 2, 7, and 14.

RESULTS

Mean platelet counts were 167.9 × 103/μL, 260.4 × 103 μ/L, 715.9 × 103/μL, and 582.2 × 103/μL on days 0, 2, 7, and 14, respectively, and were significantly higher at all postoperative assessment points than on day 0. Thrombocytosis was observed in 3% (1/34), 6% (2/33), 81% (21/26), and 69% (18/26) of dogs on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. Platelet counts > 1,000 × 103/μL were observed in 1 dog on day 2 and in 5 dogs on day 7. One or more thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability were observed in 45% (15/33), 84% (26/31), 89% (24/27), and 84% (21/25) of dogs on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. At each assessment point, higher platelet counts were correlated with thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Marked thrombocytosis and thromboelastography values suggestive of hypercoagulability were common during the first 2 weeks after splenectomy for the dogs of this study. If present, hypercoagulability could increase the risk for development of postsplenectomy thrombotic conditions such as portal system thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Phipps’ present address is Pieper Veterinary, 730 Randolph Rd, Middletown, CT 06457.

Address correspondence to Dr. Berg (john.berg@tufts.edu).