• 1. Liptak JM, Forrest LJ. Soft tissue sarcomas. In: Vail DM, ed. Withrow and MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology. 5th ed. St Louis: Elsevier Saunders, 2013;356380.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Kuntz CA, Dernell WS, Powers BE, et al. Prognostic factors for surgical treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas in dogs: 75 cases (1986–1996). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:11471151.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Gillette SM, Dewhirst MW, Gillette EL, et al. Response of canine soft tissue sarcomas to radiation or radiation plus hyperthermia: a randomized phase II study. Int J Hyperthermia 1992;8:309320.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. McKnight JA, Mauldin GN, McEntee MC, et al. Radiation treatment for incompletely resected soft-tissue sarcomas in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:205210.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Forrest LJ, Chun R, Adams WM, et al. Postoperative radiotherapy for canine soft tissue sarcoma. J Vet Intern Med 2000;14:578582.

  • 6. Kung MBJ, Poirier VJ, Dennis MM, et al. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of microscopic canine soft tissue sarcoma. Vet Comp Oncol 2016;14:e135e145.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7. Plavec T, Kessler M, Kandel B, et al. Palliative radiotherapy as treatment for non-resectable soft tissue sarcomas in the dog—a report of 15 cases. Vet Comp Oncol 2006;4:98103.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8. Lawrence J, Forrest L, Adams W, et al. Four-fraction radiation therapy for macroscopic soft tissue sarcomas in 16 dogs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2008;44:100108.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9. Cancedda S, Marconato L, Meier V, et al. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for macroscopic canine soft tissue sarcoma: a retrospective study of 50 cases treated with a 5 × 6 Gy protocol with or without metronomic chemotherapy. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2016;57:7583.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10. Khan FM, Gibbons JP. Stereotactic body radiation therapy. In: Khan's the physics of radiation therapy. 5th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014;467474.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11. Brown JM, Carlson DJ, Brenner DJ. The tumor radiobiology of SRS and SBRT: are more than the 5 Rs involved? Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2014;88:254262.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12. Brown JM, Brenner DJ, Carlson DJ. Dose escalation, not “new biology,” can account for the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy with non-small cell lung cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2013; 85:11591160.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13. Benedict SH, Yenice KM, Followill D, et al. Stereotactic body radiation therapy: the report of AAPM Task Group 101 [Erratum published in Med Phys 2012;39:563). Med Phys 2010;37:40784101.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14. Fowler JF. 21 years of biologically effective dose. Br J Radiol 2010;83:554568.

  • 15. Ladue T, Klein MK, Veterinary Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Toxicity criteria of the veterinary radiation therapy oncology group. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2001;42:475476.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16. Nguyen SM, Thamm DH, Vail DM, et al. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumors in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document. Vet Comp Oncol 2015;13:176183.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17. Stefanello D, Morello E, Roccabianca P, et al. Marginal excision of low-grade spindle cell sarcoma of canine extremities: 35 dogs (1996–2006). Vet Surg 2008;37:461465.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18. Nolan MW, Griffin LR, Custis JT, et al. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for treatment of injection-site sarcomas in cats: 11 cases (2008–2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013;243:526531.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19. Miki Y, Ngan S, Clark JC, et al. The significance of size change of soft tissue sarcoma during preoperative radiotherapy. Eur J Surg Oncol 2010;36:678683.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas in 35 dogs

View More View Less
  • 1 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4 Canada
  • | 2 2Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4 Canada
  • | 3 3PetCure Oncology, 8770 W Bryn Mawr, Ste 1370, Chicago, IL 60631

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe response rate, tumor progression, patient survival times, prognostic factors associated with tumor progression and patient survival times, and radiation toxicoses (acute and latent) in dogs treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for soft tissue sarcomas (STS).

ANIMALS

35 client-owned dogs with STS treated with curative-intent SBRT between October 2011 and May 2017.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent SBRT. Dogs with oral tumors, hemangiosarcoma, or histiocytic sarcoma were excluded. Data collected included patient-, STS-, and SBRT-related information, including follow-up information pertaining to tumor progression and patient survival time for ≥ 6 months, unless tumor progression or patient death occurred sooner.

RESULTS

Objective measurements allowing for evaluation of tumor response were available for 28 dogs, of which 13 (46%) had either a partial (10/28 [36%]) or complete (3/28 [11%]) response. Twenty-four dogs died, and the medians for progression-free survival time, time to progression of disease, overall survival time, and disease-specific survival time were 521, 705, 713, and 1,149 days, respectively. Low histologic grade and extremity locations of STSs were positive prognostic factors for patient survival times. Acute adverse effects were limited to skin, and 1 dog underwent limb amputation because of a nonhealing wound.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that SBRT for STS was well tolerated in most dogs and provided local tumor control. Additional studies are needed to determine the best SBRT protocol for treatment of STSs in dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe response rate, tumor progression, patient survival times, prognostic factors associated with tumor progression and patient survival times, and radiation toxicoses (acute and latent) in dogs treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for soft tissue sarcomas (STS).

ANIMALS

35 client-owned dogs with STS treated with curative-intent SBRT between October 2011 and May 2017.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent SBRT. Dogs with oral tumors, hemangiosarcoma, or histiocytic sarcoma were excluded. Data collected included patient-, STS-, and SBRT-related information, including follow-up information pertaining to tumor progression and patient survival time for ≥ 6 months, unless tumor progression or patient death occurred sooner.

RESULTS

Objective measurements allowing for evaluation of tumor response were available for 28 dogs, of which 13 (46%) had either a partial (10/28 [36%]) or complete (3/28 [11%]) response. Twenty-four dogs died, and the medians for progression-free survival time, time to progression of disease, overall survival time, and disease-specific survival time were 521, 705, 713, and 1,149 days, respectively. Low histologic grade and extremity locations of STSs were positive prognostic factors for patient survival times. Acute adverse effects were limited to skin, and 1 dog underwent limb amputation because of a nonhealing wound.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that SBRT for STS was well tolerated in most dogs and provided local tumor control. Additional studies are needed to determine the best SBRT protocol for treatment of STSs in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Gagnon (jerome.gagnon@usask.ca).