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Evaluation of a novel technique involving ultrasound-guided, temporary, percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy catheter placement for providing sustained gastric decompression in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus

W. Alexander Fox-Alvarez1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

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J. Brad Case1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

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Daniel D. Lewis1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

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Ashley C. Joyce1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

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Kirsten L. Cooke1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32608.

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Beau Toskich2Department of Radiology-Vascular Interventional Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Rd S, Jacksonville, FL 32224.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound-guided, temporary, percutaneous T-fastener gastropexy (TG) and gastrostomy catheter (GC) placement for providing sustained gastric decompression in dogs with acute gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and to compare findings with those of trocarization.

ANIMALS

16 dogs with GDV.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to undergo gastric decompression by means of percutaneous trocarization (trocar group; n = 8) or temporary TG and GC placement (TTG+GC group; 8) with ultrasound guidance. The gastric volvulus was then surgically corrected, and the decompression sites were examined. Outcomes were compared between groups.

RESULTS

The proportion of dogs with successful decompression did not differ significantly between the TTG+GC (6/8) and trocar (7/8) groups; median procedure duration was 3.3 and 3.7 minutes, respectively. After the failed attempts in the TTG+GC group, the procedure was modified to include ultrasound guidance during T-fastener placement. The decrease in intragastric pressure by 5 minutes after trocar or GC insertion was similar between groups. For dogs in the TTG+GC group, no significant difference in intragastric pressure was identified between 5 and 60 minutes after GC insertion. Complications included inadvertent splenic or jejunal placement in 2 dogs (TTG+GC group) and malpositioned and ineffective trocar placement in 1 dog (trocar group). All dogs survived for at least 2 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Ultrasound-guided, temporary, percutaneous TG and GC placement was safe and effective at providing sustained gastric decompression in dogs with GDV, suggesting that this technique would be ideal for dogs in which surgical delays are anticipated or unavoidable.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound-guided, temporary, percutaneous T-fastener gastropexy (TG) and gastrostomy catheter (GC) placement for providing sustained gastric decompression in dogs with acute gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and to compare findings with those of trocarization.

ANIMALS

16 dogs with GDV.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to undergo gastric decompression by means of percutaneous trocarization (trocar group; n = 8) or temporary TG and GC placement (TTG+GC group; 8) with ultrasound guidance. The gastric volvulus was then surgically corrected, and the decompression sites were examined. Outcomes were compared between groups.

RESULTS

The proportion of dogs with successful decompression did not differ significantly between the TTG+GC (6/8) and trocar (7/8) groups; median procedure duration was 3.3 and 3.7 minutes, respectively. After the failed attempts in the TTG+GC group, the procedure was modified to include ultrasound guidance during T-fastener placement. The decrease in intragastric pressure by 5 minutes after trocar or GC insertion was similar between groups. For dogs in the TTG+GC group, no significant difference in intragastric pressure was identified between 5 and 60 minutes after GC insertion. Complications included inadvertent splenic or jejunal placement in 2 dogs (TTG+GC group) and malpositioned and ineffective trocar placement in 1 dog (trocar group). All dogs survived for at least 2 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Ultrasound-guided, temporary, percutaneous TG and GC placement was safe and effective at providing sustained gastric decompression in dogs with GDV, suggesting that this technique would be ideal for dogs in which surgical delays are anticipated or unavoidable.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Video S1 (MP4 128241 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Fox-Alvarez (walvarez@ufl.edu).