• 1. Rioja E, Sinclair M, Chalmers H, et al. Comparison of three techniques for paravertebral brachial plexus blockade in dogs. Vet Anaesth Analg 2012;39:190200.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2. Portela DA, Verdier N, Otero PE. Regional anesthetic techniques for the thoracic limb and thorax in small animals: a review of the literature and technique description. Vet J 2018;241:819.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3. Hofmeister EH, Kent M, Read MR. Paravertebral block for forelimb anesthesia in the dog—an anatomic study. Vet Anaesth Analg 2007;34:139142.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4. Viscasillas J, Sanchis-Mora S, Hoy C, et al. Transient Horner's syndrome after paravertebral brachial plexus blockade in a dog. Vet Anaesth Analg 2013;40:104106.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5. Choquette A, Del Castillo JRE, Moreau M, et al. Comparison of lidocaine and lidocaine-epinephrine for the paravertebral brachial plexus block in dogs. Vet Anaesth Analg 2017;44: 317328.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6. Allam MW, Lee DG, Nulsen FE, et al. The anatomy of the brachial plexus of the dog. Anat Rec 1952;114:173179.

  • 7. Mahler SP, Adogwa AO. Anatomical and experimental studies of brachial plexus, sciatic and femoral nerve location using peripheral nerve stimulation in the dog. Vet Anaesth Analg 2008;35:8089.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Anesthesia Case of the Month

View More View Less
  • 1 1Department of Veterinary Surgical and Radiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
History

An approximately 2-year-old 23.9-kg (52.6-lb) spayed female mixed-breed dog was referred to the orthopedic service of the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) for evaluation of lameness in the left thoracic limb. The dog had a history of trauma about 1 year earlier and was presumed at the time to have been hit by a car. The referring veterinarian performed radiography at that time and diagnosed left elbow joint luxation.

On physical examination at the VMTH, the dog was bright, alert, and responsive and had a heart rate of 120 beats/min (reference range, 70 to 120 beats/min),

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Chohan (aschohan@ucdavis.edu).