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  • 1 1Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
  • | 2 2Department of Comparative Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
History

Two aborted fetuses (A and B) from a 4-year-old ewe were submitted for an abortion evaluation. Fetuses A and B had a crown-to-rump length of 41.8 cm and 42.5 cm, respectively, indicating a gestational age each of approximately 19 to 21 weeks. This ewe was from a group of approximately 40 ewes. In this flock, 3 other ewes aborted; 1 ewe aborted midgestation and the other 2 ewes aborted around the same date and stage of gestation as this ewe. Another ewe in this flock gave birth to twins, one of which was stillborn and one that was weak

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Hanlon (jhanlon@purdue.edu).