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Frontal sinusitis in adult beef bulls: 18 cases (1999–2014)

Katharine M. Simpson1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Robert N. Streeter2Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Jared D. Taylor3Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Chad A. Baumwart4Highland Veterinary Clinic, 10078 US-183, Arapaho, OK 73620.

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Melanie J. Boileau2Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize frontal sinusitis unrelated to standard dehorning procedures in adult beef bulls.

ANIMALS

18 beef bulls > 2 years of age treated for frontal sinusitis at a veterinary medical teaching hospital between May 1999 and May 2014.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed. Information obtained for each bull included signalment, history, findings from physical examination and diagnostic procedures, treatment, and survival to discharge. Long-term follow-up (≥ 1 year) was obtained from owners by telephone.

RESULTS

18 bulls were included, and 17 were bucking bulls. Median age and duration of signs were 4.5 years and 23 days, respectively. The most common owner complaints were nonspecific signs (eg, separation from the herd, hypo- or anorexia, and weight loss; n = 10) and suspected horn or sinus infection (7). Only 8 bulls had nasal discharge, and only 7 of the 17 bulls for which the rectal temperature was recorded were febrile. Results of radiography indicated frontal sinusitis in 12 of 13 bulls, with increased opacity of the affected sinus (n = 11) noted most commonly. Seventeen bulls were discharged from the hospital alive. Long-term follow-up was obtained for 14 bulls, including 13 bucking bulls. All 14 bulls recovered fully, and 9 of the 13 bucking bulls performed well after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that frontal sinusitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in beef cattle examined for nonspecific clinical signs and that, with appropriate treatment, the prognosis is good for long-term survival in affected beef cattle.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize frontal sinusitis unrelated to standard dehorning procedures in adult beef bulls.

ANIMALS

18 beef bulls > 2 years of age treated for frontal sinusitis at a veterinary medical teaching hospital between May 1999 and May 2014.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed. Information obtained for each bull included signalment, history, findings from physical examination and diagnostic procedures, treatment, and survival to discharge. Long-term follow-up (≥ 1 year) was obtained from owners by telephone.

RESULTS

18 bulls were included, and 17 were bucking bulls. Median age and duration of signs were 4.5 years and 23 days, respectively. The most common owner complaints were nonspecific signs (eg, separation from the herd, hypo- or anorexia, and weight loss; n = 10) and suspected horn or sinus infection (7). Only 8 bulls had nasal discharge, and only 7 of the 17 bulls for which the rectal temperature was recorded were febrile. Results of radiography indicated frontal sinusitis in 12 of 13 bulls, with increased opacity of the affected sinus (n = 11) noted most commonly. Seventeen bulls were discharged from the hospital alive. Long-term follow-up was obtained for 14 bulls, including 13 bucking bulls. All 14 bulls recovered fully, and 9 of the 13 bucking bulls performed well after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that frontal sinusitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in beef cattle examined for nonspecific clinical signs and that, with appropriate treatment, the prognosis is good for long-term survival in affected beef cattle.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Simpson (simpson1@colostate.edu).