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What Is Your Neurologic Diagnosis?

Gregory Kaiman VMD1, Alison M. Lee DVM, MS2, and Michaela J. Beasley DVM, MS2
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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
  • | 2 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

A 10-year-old 7.6-kg (16.7-lb) spayed female Pekingese was referred for evaluation because of progressive clinical signs including dull mentation, circling to the right, a right-sided head turn, head pressing, and, more recently, coughing, vomiting, anorexia, and melena. Empirical treatment with dexamethasone sodium phosphate, an antimicrobial, and a gastroprotectant was unsuccessful in resolving the clinical signs. Results of serum biochemical analysis and a CBC prior to referral revealed mildly high alkaline phosphatase activity and a stress leukogram.

What is the problem? Where is the lesion? What are the most probable causes of this problem? What is your plan to establish a

Contributor Notes

This feature is published in coordination with the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine on behalf of the specialty of neurology. Contributors to this feature should contact Dr. Helen L. Simons (hsimons@avma.org) for case submission forms. Submissions will be sent to Dr. Karen Kline, DVM, DACVIM, for her review, except when Dr. Kline is an author.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kaiman (gregkaiman@gmail.com).