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Evaluation of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 Tesla for differentiation between intracranial neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory lesions in dogs

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  • 1 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values obtained by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) at 3.0 T for differentiating intracranial neoplastic lesions from noninfectious inflammatory lesions (NIILs) in dogs.

ANIMALS

54 dogs that met inclusion criteria (ie, had a histologically confirmed intracranial lesion and DWI of the brain performed) with 5 lesion types: meningioma [n = 18], glioma [14], metastatic hemangiosarcoma [3], other metastatic neoplasms [5], and NIIL [14]).

PROCEDURES

Two observers, who were blinded to the histologic diagnoses, independently determined the mean ADC and FA values for each evaluated intracranial lesion on the basis of 3 circular regions of interest on DWI images. Findings were compared among the 5 lesion types, between all neoplasms combined and NIILs, and between the 5 legion types and previously determined values for corresponding locations for neurologically normal dogs.

RESULTS

The mean ADC and FA values did not differ significantly among the 5 lesion types or between all neoplasms combined and NIILs. However, 35% (14/40) of the neoplastic lesions had an ADC value ≥ 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s, whereas all NIILs had ADC values < 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s. Meningiomas and NIILs had FA values that were significantly lower than those for neurologically normal dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In this population of dogs, the FA values for meningiomas and NIILs differed significantly from those previously reported for neurologically normal dogs. In addition, an ADC cutoff value of 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s appeared to be highly specific for diagnosing neoplastic lesions (vs NIILs), although the sensitivity and accuracy were low.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values obtained by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) at 3.0 T for differentiating intracranial neoplastic lesions from noninfectious inflammatory lesions (NIILs) in dogs.

ANIMALS

54 dogs that met inclusion criteria (ie, had a histologically confirmed intracranial lesion and DWI of the brain performed) with 5 lesion types: meningioma [n = 18], glioma [14], metastatic hemangiosarcoma [3], other metastatic neoplasms [5], and NIIL [14]).

PROCEDURES

Two observers, who were blinded to the histologic diagnoses, independently determined the mean ADC and FA values for each evaluated intracranial lesion on the basis of 3 circular regions of interest on DWI images. Findings were compared among the 5 lesion types, between all neoplasms combined and NIILs, and between the 5 legion types and previously determined values for corresponding locations for neurologically normal dogs.

RESULTS

The mean ADC and FA values did not differ significantly among the 5 lesion types or between all neoplasms combined and NIILs. However, 35% (14/40) of the neoplastic lesions had an ADC value ≥ 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s, whereas all NIILs had ADC values < 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s. Meningiomas and NIILs had FA values that were significantly lower than those for neurologically normal dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In this population of dogs, the FA values for meningiomas and NIILs differed significantly from those previously reported for neurologically normal dogs. In addition, an ADC cutoff value of 1.443 × 10−3 mm2/s appeared to be highly specific for diagnosing neoplastic lesions (vs NIILs), although the sensitivity and accuracy were low.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Maclellan's present address is BluePearl Veterinary Partners, 7717 Flying Cloud Dr, Eden Prairie, MN 55344.

Address correspondence to Dr. Maclellan (meganjmaclellan@gmail.com).