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  • 3. Seo H, Cha SI, Shin KM, et al. Focal necrotizing pneumonia is a distinct entity from lung abscess. Respirology 2013;18:10951100.

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Biosciences and Diagnostic Imaging, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
History

A 4-year-old 10-kg (22-lb) spayed female French Bulldog was referred because of pleural effusion and aspiration pneumonia following treatment (induction of emesis and oral administration of activated charcoal) of an accidental overdose of trazodone that occurred 19 days earlier. Thoracic radiography performed by the referring veterinarian revealed a severe alveolar pattern in the right middle lung lobe and an interstitial to alveolar pattern in the cranial lung lobes. Thoracocentesis performed by the referring veterinarian yielded dark red to black fluid that by cytologic examination was determined to have been aseptic.

Transverse thoracic CT images at the level

Contributor Notes

Dr. Witherow's present address is Deason Animal Hospital, 1712 D St, Floresville, TX 78114.

Address correspondence to Dr. Wallace (mandywl@uga.edu).