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Letters to the Editor

Suicide among veterinarians

I found the recent study1 on suicide among US veterinarians to be both interesting and balanced. The subject matter is quite broad, and it would be interesting to see follow-up studies on how proportionate mortality ratios for suicide among veterinarians compared with ratios for physicians and individuals in other professions, along with studies comparing ratios for associate veterinarians versus veterinary practice owners.

In their discussion, the authors speculated that one factor that may help to explain the high risk of suicide among veterinarians was the fact that “veterinarians are trained to view euthanasia as an