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Comparison of closed root planing with versus without concurrent doxycycline hyclate or clindamycin hydrochloride gel application for the treatment of periodontal disease in dogs

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  • 1 Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
  • | 2 Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10065.
  • | 3 Lamb Statistical Consulting LLC, 404 Thompson Ave W, West Saint Paul, MN 55118.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Center of Long Island, 75 Sunrise Hwy, West Islip, NY 11795.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare improvements in values for periodontal disease indices in dogs following treatment with closed root planing (CRP) alone, CRP with concurrent 8.5% doxycycline hyclate gel application, and CRP with concurrent 2% clindamycin hydrochloride reverse-polymer hydrogel application.

DESIGN Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 34 client-owned dogs with periodontal pockets measuring 3.5 to 5.5 mm deep.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 treatments: CRP alone (n = 10) or CRP plus 8.5% doxycycline hyclate (12) or 2% clindamycin hydrochloride (12) gel applied within the periodontal pockets. Indices of periodontal disease severity were recorded before and 12 weeks after treatment, and outcomes were compared among treatment groups.

RESULTS Except for gingivitis index, no significant differences were identified among the 3 treatment groups in the amount of improvement observed in values for periodontal disease indices following treatment. A minor but clinically unimportant improvement in mean gingivitis index values was identified for dogs treated with CRP plus doxycycline gel, which differed significantly from improvements in the other 2 groups. Teeth that were initially more severely affected (pocket depths, 5.0 to 5.5 mm) had the greatest amount of improvement, whereas teeth with only mildly high initial pocket depths (3.5 to 4.0 mm) had less improvement.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall, addition of doxycycline or clindamycin gel application to CRP for the treatment of periodontal disease in dogs yielded no clinically relevant benefit over CRP during the 12-week follow-up period.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare improvements in values for periodontal disease indices in dogs following treatment with closed root planing (CRP) alone, CRP with concurrent 8.5% doxycycline hyclate gel application, and CRP with concurrent 2% clindamycin hydrochloride reverse-polymer hydrogel application.

DESIGN Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS 34 client-owned dogs with periodontal pockets measuring 3.5 to 5.5 mm deep.

PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 treatments: CRP alone (n = 10) or CRP plus 8.5% doxycycline hyclate (12) or 2% clindamycin hydrochloride (12) gel applied within the periodontal pockets. Indices of periodontal disease severity were recorded before and 12 weeks after treatment, and outcomes were compared among treatment groups.

RESULTS Except for gingivitis index, no significant differences were identified among the 3 treatment groups in the amount of improvement observed in values for periodontal disease indices following treatment. A minor but clinically unimportant improvement in mean gingivitis index values was identified for dogs treated with CRP plus doxycycline gel, which differed significantly from improvements in the other 2 groups. Teeth that were initially more severely affected (pocket depths, 5.0 to 5.5 mm) had the greatest amount of improvement, whereas teeth with only mildly high initial pocket depths (3.5 to 4.0 mm) had less improvement.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall, addition of doxycycline or clindamycin gel application to CRP for the treatment of periodontal disease in dogs yielded no clinically relevant benefit over CRP during the 12-week follow-up period.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Table S1 (PDF 164 kb)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Martel (django.martel@amcny.org).