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Outcome following computed tomographic imaging and subsequent surgical removal of keratomas in equids: 32 cases (2005–2016)

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  • 1 William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the use of CT in the diagnosis of and presurgical planning for equids with keratomas treated by hoof wall resection and determine postoperative complications and outcome.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 29 horses and 3 mules with keratomas treated by partial or complete hoof wall resection following CT imaging of the distal portion of the affected extremity from 2005 through 2016.

PROCEDURES For each equid, physical examination and lameness evaluation were performed, followed by imaging of the distal portion of the affected extremity. A tentative diagnosis of keratoma was made given results of clinical, radiographic, and CT examination, with the definitive diagnosis made on histologic examination. After CT imaging, each equid was treated with hoof wall resection.

RESULTS CT allowed accurate identification of the size and location of 35 keratomas in 33 feet. Thirty equids underwent partial and 2 underwent complete hoof wall resection for keratoma removal. Complications developed in 4 of 31 (13%) equids and included excessive granulation tissue formation at the surgical site (n = 1), excessive granulation tissue formation and worsening lameness (1), incomplete keratoma removal with suspected regrowth (1), and incomplete healing of the surgical site with distal interphalangeal joint sepsis secondary to repeated debridement of abnormal tissue (1). Twenty-eight of 31 (90%) equids returned to their previous activity level.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Preoperative CT examination of the feet was useful in the diagnosis of and surgical planning for keratomas in equids. A low complication rate was achieved with the described techniques.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Katzman (sakatzman@gmail.com).